A note from the editor Please consider making a v

first_imgA note from the editor:Please consider making a voluntary financial contribution to support the work of DNS and allow it to continue producing independent, carefully-researched news stories that focus on the lives and rights of disabled people and their user-led organisations. Please do not contribute if you cannot afford to do so, and please note that DNS is not a charity. It is run and owned by disabled journalist John Pring and has been from its launch in April 2009. Thank you for anything you can do to support the work of DNS… Disabled Labour supporters have described some of the ways in which left-wing activists could push back against years of government austerity, oppression and attacks on inclusion.They were speaking at two events taking place on the fringes of this week’s Labour conference in Liverpool, both organised by disabled researchers and campaigners Dr Paul Darke and Miro Griffiths.Griffiths told one of the fringe events that he believed there was a need to “build stronger alliances and bring more disabled people into our activities, our activism”.He warned that disabled people had “normalised” and “absorbed” the oppression and marginalisation they were experiencing in society and now saw it “as an everyday occurrence”.He said: “What the government has done very clearly, in its policy and its rhetoric, is to say that if you experience marginalisation then it’s your fault. You take individual responsibility for it.”Griffiths said activists and campaigners needed to think about how they could “politicise people’s everyday experiences”.He said that the problem faced by those on the left was the lack of an alternative vision to the one presented by right-wingers, who had “manipulated and taken over the vision and it is one of desperation, it’s one of fighting each other, of equality groups fighting each other for essential resources”.He said there was a need for more disabled people’s assemblies, more user-led organisations, and political parties to fund and provide resources so activists and campaigners “can have that space to decide what is our vision”.Pam Thomas, a “radical disabled socialist and activist” who is now a city councillor in Liverpool and the council’s cabinet member for an inclusive and accessible city, said it was “really important for disabled people to become involved in politics”.As a member of the regional transport committee, she has been able to use her influence to ensure that a new order of trains for the underground service will be a model that she can board and exit “on equal terms with everybody else”.As a result, the new trains will be the same height as the station platforms, with a sliding ramp coming out from the trains to meet the platform and allow level access for wheelchair-users.Work is being carried out across the underground network to ensure that platforms will be the right height when the trains are available from 2020.The system, she said, would be more accessible than London’s and will be “probably the most accessible system in the country”.She said: “That would not have happened if I had not been on that committee, so it’s really important for disabled people to get involved in politics.”Thomas said she welcomed the “move to the left” across the country but was “not convinced that things are going to be any easier for us in terms of being included and being taken account of”.She added: “There are still very many non-disabled people who do not have a clue… they really do not know the kind of barriers we encounter.”About 100 people attended a second event hosted by Darke and Griffiths, this time as part of The World Transformed, a festival organised on the conference fringes by the left-wing movement Momentum.Darke told the event that he believed there was a need for a “radical transformation” of an organisation like the BBC, which he said was guilty of “woeful” levels of expenditure, coverage and inclusion of disabled people, and needed a huge increase in the proportion of its staff who identify as disabled people so it becomes “truly representative of the country”.And although he was opposed to the existence of the House of Lords, he said there needed to be more disabled peers so that “their voice is heard” and disabled people do not have non-disabled politicians speaking for them.Darke said at the earlier fringe event that he believed that “society hates disabled people”.He said that “normal people… hate themselves, so the idea that they are going to be progressive towards us is not really going to happen”.He said their identity was “so fragile” that they “reject and fear difference to such a degree that they flail out with ignorance and hatred, marginalisation and discrimination”.Darke pointed to the example of Denmark, which is seen as a progressive, liberal society and an ally of Britain but has boasted that it wants to eliminate Down’s syndrome within a generation, a wish, he said, that “Hitler could only have dreamed of”.He said afterwards that the only hope for opposing the current “neoliberalism and utilitarianism” of the right – which “sees no value in disabled people” – was through the politics of the left.But he said that even those on the left either do not understand or do not care about disabled people and “don’t allow us our voice”.Griffiths told the Momentum event that there were frameworks in place through the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities that showed “how to realise inclusion of disabled people”, but the “reality on the ground is nowhere near reflecting that”.He said the government had a “complete disregard for the lives of disabled people”, which it demonstrated in its “dismissal” of the UN’s repeated concerns about the UK’s implementation of the convention.Much of the current activism, said Griffiths, was “in the here and now”, with disabled activists “trying to prevent the violence, the destruction of life, the further institutionalisation and marginalisation”, and was therefore stuck in “crisis-driven agendas”.He said: “We don’t have enough of a vision of what we mean by a safer, inclusive, accessible environment and society.“Where is the vision we can offer to everyone to say ‘this is what society should be built like’?“The right continue to fragment us, to take away resources, so we end up fighting each other.“Disabled people’s experiences illustrate how it is so easy to roll back on the advancements that have been gained by activists and groups, because our social justice and human rights are conditional, they are based on whether they meet the economic and political objectives of the state.“So we cannot just rely on rights, we also have to have a vision, a vision that we can offer to other people.” Disabled campaigner and consultant Richard Rieser said he agreed with Griffiths and said that the “strength of the movement determines what rights we get”.He said he wanted to see the development of an organisation that could provide “one voice for disabled people” in this country, while there was also a need to build a representative “mass movement” internationally.He said there was no point the UN saying that access was a fundamental human right – which it does through the disability convention – if disabled people do not have the political strength to implement that right.He said: “We have to build the strength both here and abroad.“It seems to me that the time has come to have that discussion about how we rebuild our movement.”Ruth Gould, artistic director of DaDaFest, which is holding its international festival showcasing disability and D/deaf arts from 1 November across Merseyside, told the first fringe event that she was often asked whether holding a “separate” festival risked perpetuating a disability “ghetto” when disabled campaigners were calling for society to be more inclusive.But she said: “We are a cultural sector that is strong and vibrant. But to me it is not about ‘them and us’, it’s about ‘us’.“We as disabled people have something really strong to say about our lived experience of disability.”She questioned why disabled people – the “second largest minority group in the country, after men” – did not do more to acknowledge and express our own culture, as other minorities do.Such artistic expressions “affirm our life experiences”, give disabled people a voice, bring them power and influence, challenge the messages in the media and “allow us to say and express the things others would prefer us to keep hidden.”*This week, DaDaFest announced its line-up for this year’s international festival, with more than 50 exhibitions, performances, talks and workshops between 1 November and 8 December across the Liverpool city region.Performers will include comedians Francesca Martinez and Laurence Clark, theatre-maker and comedian Jess Thom, Stop Gap Dance Company, artists Faith Bebbington, Jonathan Griffith, Simon McKeown and Martin O’Brien, and multi-instrumentalist Sarah Fisher.They will all explore the concepts of ageing, death and disability, and “the changing nature of all our journeys and the legacies we leave”.The festival will also commemorate the end of the First World War as “a key moment for modern recognition of disability as a social construct”.Picture: Speakers at the first of the two fringes, including Richard Rieser (second from left), Pam Thomas (third from left), Ruth Gould (fourth from left), Miro Griffths (far right) and Paul Darke (third from right)last_img read more

I think its something that I and lots of other p

first_img“I think it’s something that I and lots of other people are considering now”Labour MP @OwenSmith_MP tells @EmmaBarnett he’s considering whether to quit the Labour party over their #Brexit stance.#EmmaBarnettShow pic.twitter.com/FaWpBv4n5h— BBC Radio 5 Live (@bbc5live) February 7, 2019Owen Smith, who ran against Jeremy Corbyn as leader in 2016, has told the BBC he is “considering” quitting the Labour Party over its position on Brexit.Following the news of Corbyn’s five demands for a Brexit deal, Smith described the question of whether he could “in all good conscience remain a member of the Labour Party” as a “good” one.“I think it’s something that I and lots of other people are considering now,” the backbench Corbynsceptic MP said.On whether the moment to leave Labour is now, Smith commented: “No, I don’t think it is quite yet. We – those of us who believe that Brexit is wrong in principle for our country and wrong in practice – still have an opportunity to try and influence within the Labour Party…”Asked whether he is going to resign, the MP replied: “I haven’t come to that decision.”Smith supports the idea of another EU referendum, which the Labour leadership has left open as an option but does not favour.Tags:Labour /Owen Smith /BBC Radio 5 Live /last_img read more

SF Police Commission President against using State DOJ as reform overseer

first_imgUntil this fall, the DOJ was overseeing the implementation of its 272 recommendations — oversight that U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions ended in September.Turman said that the State Attorney General’s office has no background in facilitating police reform and is unfit for the role.“From the beginning, and I say now, the California Department of Justice is not the proper party to have this responsibility, because they don’t have any experience with collaborative reform,” he said.“Their experience is with bringing pattern-and-practice cases against departments and takeovers and oversight, which is not what we require or need (for) the San Francisco Police Department,” he continued.Turman said he continues to be a part of discussions between city and state officials to ensure that the state did not usurp the Commission’s role as the primary oversight body of the department.“My stated goal and purpose then and now was to make sure that … they do not, in written form or in deed, understand their roles to ever be to supplant the duties and responsibilities of this commission when it comes to oversight,” he said.How the commission will work with SFPD and the California Attorney General to pass policies related to the reform effort will be discussed at a future date, he said.“Despite what you might have read, there is no oversight taken up over this police department by the Cal DOJ,” he said.In other business, The San Francisco Police Department’s Tasers will likely cost the city about $3.5 million, SFPD Financial Director Catherine McGuire said Wednesday while outlining the new SFPD budget to the Police Commission.The $3 million is to be spent on the equipment over “a number of years,” and $500,000 will go to “information-technology integration,” McGuire said.A “train the trainer” program with Taser International, the company supplying the stun guns, is included $3.5 million, said David Stevenson, director of communications for the SFPD. Other training costs are included in general training for officers.The amount is well below the $8 million the city’s budget analyst estimated before the Commission voted 4-3 in favor of arming the department with Tasers in November.The Commission voted unanimously to approve a $623.7 million budget that includes the spending on Tasers. It will now be reviewed by the Mayor’s office, and the Board of Supervisors will vote on its adoption in July. 0% Tags: police • SFPD Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%center_img Police Commission President Julius Turman on Wednesday blasted the SFPD’s decision to have the State Attorney General oversee the reform process started by the U.S. Department of Justice.“Despite my objections — and, when I was not present, despite Commissioner (Thomas) Mazzucco’s objections — this was the party selected out of other outside agencies to do this work,” said Turman during a pointed, six-minute statement.On Monday, California Attorney General Xavier Becerra announced that his office would begin overseeing the SFPD’s implementation of the 272 recommendations made by the U.S. Department of Justice.The Department of Justice’s scrutiny and recommendations came after six police shootings in 2015, and the revelation in 2014 that 14 officers participated in sending and receiving racist, sexist and homophobic texts between 2011 and 2012.last_img read more

SAINTS Heritage Society and the Rugby League Colle

first_imgSAINTS Heritage Society and the Rugby League Collectors Federation (RLCF) are holding a Programme Fair and Rugby League Memorabilia Auction in the Red Vee Cafe, at Langtree Park, this Saturday (May 18).Commencing at 10.30am, several old Programmes, Photographs, Badges, Collectors Cards, Annuals and other Rugby League Memorabilia will be both on sale and display.And Saints’ Heritage Society will also have a stall raising monies for our Australian Academy Tour Fund.The RLCF Auction begins at 12.30 pm and has the potential to be one of their best Auctions to date with 204 items going under the hammer.The highlights of the sale include a programme from the 1931 Challenge Cup Final played at Wembley between York and Halifax, two items from the 1997 World Club Challenge i.e. the programme that covered the two semi-finals Brisbane v Auckland & Cronulla v Hunter, plus the programme from the Brisbane v Hunter final, seventeen separate lots of ‘original’ framed photographs featuring England / Gt. Britain Touring teams published by the Melba Studios, Sydney and a very unique piece of St. Helens Rugby League Memorabilia.An oil painting of the 1956 Challenge Cup winning team is to be auctioned. This was found as a half-finished piece at Knowsley Road in the mid-1980s. The Saints Supporters Club asked a local artist to complete it and it has been hung at the club itself, before finding a more recent home in the Black Bull Pub on Knowsley Road. This picture is 51′ x 41′.Admission is free of charge and adequate parking is available at the Stadium. Image shows Glyn Moses, Saints’ full back in the 1956 Challenge Cup winning team, with the painting that is to be auctioned.last_img read more

SAINTS can confirm that Francis Meli will be leavi

first_imgSAINTS can confirm that Francis Meli will be leaving the club at the end of the season.The 34-year-old International has been with the Saints since 2006 and has made 215 appearances, scoring 140 tries.A club official said: “We like to place on record our gratitude to Francis for his effort and commitment to the club since he signed in 2006. He has been a consummate professional and one of our strongest strike players in the Super League era.“We’d like to wish him all the best at Salford City Reds next year and we’re sure Francis will want to finish his Saints career on a high.”last_img read more

YOUNG diehard St Helens supporter and tireless vo

first_imgYOUNG die-hard St Helens supporter and tireless volunteer, Liam Jones, recently had the chance to meet Saints legend, Paul Wellens, to mark him being crowned the St Helens BRUT Fan of Pride 2014.After a public online vote Liam was chosen to win the prestigious award for both his volunteering commitments with the St Helens Community Foundation, which includes coaching youngsters and raising money for charity, and his unwavering loyalty to his beloved Saints.Liam’s pride at being named St Helens BRUT Fan of Pride is evident: “I am delighted to be named as the Fan of Pride for Saints. I have supported Saints since I was eleven when my mum first took me to Knowsley Road, and I always do my best not to miss a match – I’ve only missed Catalans away this season.“I love sport and since starting volunteering by coaching rugby league at university, and then with the Saints Foundation, I think this is something I’d love to continue to do. Although I am young I definitely want to share my knowledge and enthusiasm of the game with the children I coach. I love helping them play the sport that I love.”St Helens BRUT Fan of Pride player ambassador, Paul Wellens, commented: “It is great that BRUT recognise the importance of the supporters of the Super League. Being a Saints lad through and through I grew up watching the team on the terraces as a kid and will do so long after I retire – if I’m not involved with the club in some capacity that is!“The crowd make such a difference here at Langtree and it’s important that fans like Liam are acknowledged for their energy and support. Liam also does a huge amount for the Saints Community Foundation which he deserves to be recognised for, so it’s great that BRUT are recognising his contribution.”By winning BRUT’s Fan of Pride award for St Helens, Liam will enjoy a day out at the Super League Grand Final at Old Trafford in October, as well as some BRUT product. He will also go forward for selection for the National BRUT Fan of Pride 2014.This award will be chosen by a panel of Rugby League experts and will see the overall winner winning £5,000 for their club’s community foundation, a pair of 2015 season tickets, a signed Super League shirt and an invitation to the Man of Steel Awards.last_img read more

Runners are being invited to paint the Town Centre

first_imgRunners are being invited to paint the Town Centre red – and yellow and blue, and many other colours, in a 4k run.Fun runners, serious runners, pram-pushers, walkers – everyone in fact – are welcome to the spectacular event to jog, dance skip or even cartwheel their way whilst being showered with coloured powder.Colour run will start at 9am on Sunday September 23 with a post event colour Zumba hosted with the Saints Angels.Several players have joined the Head Coach in taking on the run and registration is now open!InfoBook on www.saintssuperstore.comlast_img read more

Low temps mean high bills concerning neighbors in Columbus County

first_img “Last year, I didn’t spend nothing like this here, nothing,” Gracie Young said.Neighbors think while trying to stay warm, they got burned.“We had one day where we burnt $28, and I said there’s no way,” Benjamin Brown said.Related Article: Toyota recalls trucks, SUVs and cars to fix air bag problemBrown and his stepsister Young have heard from dozens of neighbors with the same stories. It’s not like they did not take precautions before the cold came.“I covered my air conditioned units,” Young said.Young claims the house is more insulated than ones she’s lived in before. Still, turning on the heat is costing her roughly $20 a day.“They’re hurting, and we understand that, but what we’ve got to do is look for this warmer weather that we’re going to see this week, and then watch that usage drop off tremendously,” said Brunswick Electric Membership Cooperative Customer Service Manager Jimmy Greene.The severe cold the Cape Fear saw was below normal, but it’s not uncommon for heat bills to catch people cold if alternate heat has to be used.“You’re going to see it jump more in the winter time because of the auxiliary heat strips than what you would in the summer time when it goes from 70 degrees to 100 degrees, because you’ve got that extra electric capacity that’s coming on with the resistant heat strips,” said Justin Fulford with Fulford Heating and Cooling.Fulford said his usage increased six fold once freezing temps got here and stuck around.People like Young, though, prepay what they think they’ll use from Brunswick Electric, and now she’s already over that amount.“When my lights are going to wind up costing me more than my rent is, that’s too much,” Young said.BEMC said its rates have not changed in years.Young has applied for energy assistance with social services, and she said they will help her with $200, but she’ll have to wait a month before that comes. COLUMBUS COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — Temperatures barely made it above freezing the last several days. They stayed low, but for many, heat bills went up.Neighbors in Columbus County told WWAY they are now worried about the costs they’re seeing.- Advertisement – last_img read more

Bladen Co deputy recognized after saving choking student at football game

first_imgBLADEN COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — School Resource Deputy Kayla Moore is being hailed a hero after recently saving a Bladen County middle school student who was choking a football game.“Before receiving the letter from Principal Cole, I was not even aware of the incident,” said Bladen Co. Sheriff Jim McVicker. “Deputy Moore said she was just doing her job and did not think it was anything out of the ordinary.”- Advertisement – Moore was one of the deputies on duty during the Elizabethtown Middle School football game on October 18. Cole said while she was on duty, she assisted one of our students near the concession stand that was choking.Principal Cole says the student appeared to be short of breath and indicated through body language that he was struggling and had something lodged in his throat. Moore administered the Heimlich Maneuver and the student was able to dislodge the object.Cole said she was grateful for the partnership of the Sheriff’s Office and the schools and she was particularly thankful for Deputy Moore’s quick actions that assisted a student in a traumatic moment.Related Article: Woman accused of driving drunk into cemetery, damages tombstones“I would like to join Ms. Cole in recognizing Deputy Moore,” said the Sheriff. “She has been with our office a little over six months but has already proven herself to be an asset. Her not seeking recognition is typical of so many of my men and women who quietly go about their jobs on a daily basis, neither asking for nor seeking recognition. We are all proud of her. She is an asset to the entire county.”last_img read more

Fore IV Invitational Ready to Tee Off

first_imgThe Fore IV Invitational is a golf tournament to benefit the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and provides a day full of fun, friends, and fundraising. All of our efforts Four IV are to benefit everyone living with Cystic Fibrosis.WWAY’s Amanda Fitzpatrick interviewed CT Shaw, IV’s dad and host of the Fore IV Invitational to learn more about the fundraiser.- Advertisement – Register to play golf with us! Simply go to four-iv.com to registerin advance, or show up at Compass Pointe Golf Club at 8am on Nov. 12that 8am. We have BoJangle’s breakfast biscuits and Bloody Mary’savailable. We do a shotgun start at 9am.If you can’t play golf, you can always make a 100% tax-deductibledonation on our website or at CFF.org.last_img read more