Men’s and women’s golf tee off the regular season

first_imgSilverstein stressed his belief that the team won’t be “truly satisfied” until it completes a clean sweep of the season, winning every tournament it enters. The Trojans’ competitions include the Windy City Collegiate Invitational starting at the end of September, Stanford Intercollegiate in October and the Pac-12 Preview in November.  The Trojans will play throughout the weekend in a tough competition field that includes No. 10 Pepperdine and No. 2 Arizona State. As for the rest of the season, the men’s team will compete in several tournaments including the Nike Collegiate in Portland, Ore. and the Cypress Point Classic at Pebble Beach. As the men’s team is coming in at No. 11 in the Golf Coaches Association of America’s preseason poll, the expectations will certainly be high for the team at the invite in Scottsdale, Ariz. The starting lineup includes senior Kyle Suppa, junior Issei Tanabe, junior transfer Leon D’Souza, freshman Yuxin Lin and sophomore Charlie Reiter.  “[Lin] is playing some really good golf,” Zambri said. “His game looks like he’s ready to make a huge impact right now.” Men’s head coach Chris Zambri and women’s head coach Justin Silverstein said that they placed emphasis on competition amongst the players in the preseason. Both teams held intrasquad competitions where the five strongest performers earned spots in the starting lineup.   “It’s a process for sure,” junior Jennifer Chang said. “Obviously we had a great year last year and, you know, we just want to keep it going, keep that momentum.” The men’s golf season begins this weekend as USC hits the road for the Maui Jim Invitational, while the women start off at the Annika Invitational Monday. The Trojans are debuting fresh faces and hoping for successful results at both courses. Zambri also suggested that although Suh’s talent will be missed, the Trojans’ depth may make them a better all-around team this season. According to senior Kyle Suppa, the team’s objective this season is placing well in tournaments to establish a solid ranking for the postseason. center_img “Every tournament our goal is to win,” Suppa said. “That’s our main focus … We have to avoid bad tournaments because that can really hurt our ranking and affect our seeding going into the postseason.” WGCA, Golf Week and Golf Channel all ranked the women’s golf team No. 1 in their preseason polls. Coming off a seven-win season with all ten players returning, Silverstein’s squad is experienced and looking to continue its success. “I think we’re a little deeper this year than we were last year, and so it’s going to be hard for anyone to match the kind of year that Justin had, the kind of career that he had, but everyone clearly is hoping to,” Zambri said. “But even if we weren’t to get that kind of performance out of any one person, in total, I think we have a better team this year. “I think we’re so talented and so deep, that it helps prepare us for the end of the season with the tougher teams,” Silverstein said. As the competition season begins, both the men’s and women’s teams hope to prove that the work they put in during the preseason will show on the course. Their performances this weekend will indicate if the men’s team can recover from the loss of a star player and if the women’s team can maintain its all-star reputation. The women’s team will be heading to Lake Elmo, Minn. to compete in the Annika Invitational Monday. As a past champion of the event, the Trojans will face the top competitors in women’s college golf with No. 6 UCLA, No. 12 Arizona and No. 10 ASU all in the 54-hole stroke play. The starting lineup includes senior Aiko Leong, senior Allisen Corpuz, junior Jennifer Chang, junior Gabriela Ruffels and junior Alyaa Abdulghany.  After losing two-time All-American Justin Suh last season, whom Zambri called USC’s best men’s golfer ever, the Trojans will have to find strength in their younger players. The Maui Jim Invitational marks Lin’s first appearance in a college tournament, and Zambri is expecting big things out of the freshman.last_img read more

Emergency Crews Busy with Weekend Flooding

first_imgBy Jay Cook |MONMOUTH BEACH – Extensive flooding isn’t a new phenomenon for Monmouth Beach residents. Trekking through inches of deluge and piggybacking a stranded motorist to safety, on the other hand, seemingly was a first for one first responder.As a wet and blustery nor’easter slammed New Jersey last week with high winds and significant flooding along the Jersey Shore, Sgt. Aaron Rock of the Monmouth Beach Police Department, also the deputy office of emergency management (OEM) coordinator, was busy in his own right.High tides on March 3 brought several inches of floodwater in from the Shrewsbury River. It was also the reason one motorist trying to navigate through the flooded roadway along Sailors Way became stranded inside her car when it could no longer move.Rock said a resident flagged him down a few streets over and alerted him of the stranded car. In a police issue Humvee, he arrived to assist the driver who got stuck while making her way to work. Rock helped push her car out of deeper waters and then carried her out of the vehicle to safety on his back.“She didn’t really want to get out of the car,” Rock said. “We had a long conversation and I finally told her to get on my back, and I helped her over to the grass area. Our patrols gave her a ride to work in town here.”Although resolved without incident, situations like this are avoidable if motorists and residents follow rules and issues provided by their local police departments and OEM crews.“Trying to tell them about flooded roadways – some people really don’t understand it,” Rock said. “We meet up with the fire department and first aid and brief them on different scenarios, and they’re a big part of the collaboration in town.”Monmouth Beach was just one of the many towns in the Two River area that was affected by the gusty nor’easter that rolled into New Jersey on March 1, with side effects lasting days later due to flooding and intense tide cycles.Rock said there were no power outages reported to the Monmouth Beach Police Department during or after the storm and only one tree had fallen down, on Mann Court. “Several cars” were stuck in the floodwaters he said, including a 2017 Mercedes Benz on River Avenue and Channel Drive on March 2, Rock said.“These tide cycles have been crazy for us,” he said. “Usually it doesn’t take this long – three to four days in a row – where the tides are always coming up. This is a little different.”Just north along Ocean Avenue in Sea Bright, the same flooding effects were felt. Det. Daniel Chernovsky of the Sea Bright Police Department said moderate flooding covered Ocean Avenue near Driftwood Beach Club and the Navesink Marina, in the downtown business district around River and Center streets, and even up to the 400 block of Ocean Avenue, one of the narrowest points in Sea Bright.“It’s probably consistent with the areas of flooding we’re used to experiencing,” said Chernovsky, also the borough OEM coordinator, “but the magnitude was a little higher than what we would have seen in an event like this.”He added that, just like Monmouth Beach, there were no reported power outages in town. Chernovsky also said no property damage from the flooding was reported to the police, most likely thanks to many houses being lifted after Super Storm Sandy in 2012.Damages and personal injuries were also avoided, he believed, in part to the numerous notification services offered to residents. Sea Bright has a free Nixle alert system and a Code Red reverse 911 system. Both are meant to make everyone aware of an oncoming storm.After the nor’easter hit New Jersey on March 1, moderate flooding broke across the Shrewsbury River and covered many roadways in Monmouth Beach. The same eventually hap- pened after the most recent nor’easter storm on March 7. Photo courtesy MBPD“The old-time residents just kind of knew. They watched the weather and adapted to it,” he added, saying notification services weren’t usually needed in the past. “But the new people coming in really don’t have too much of an idea yet.”More flooding also affected low-lying areas in Middletown and Highlands, where Bay Avenue and many other side streets were inundated with flood waters.Fallen tree damage wasn’t a factor along the shore, but further inland it became an issue. Social media accounts for the Colts Neck and Holmdel police departments noted fallen trees and snarled powerlines shut down traffic in many areas around town. By the afternoon of March 2, the Colts Neck Police Department reported at least a half-dozen accidents on Route 18.At one point on March 3, six total roadways in Colts Neck were impassable: Dutch Lane Road between Cedar Drive and Heulitt Road; Laird Road between Cross Road and Muhlenbrink Road; Clover Hill Lane; Phalanx Road between Rimwood Lane and Brookdale Community College; Bray Street; and Heyers Mill Road with one lane shut down at Prothero Road.All roadways didn’t fully open until March 5 when the Phalanx Road Bridge was reopened after a downed tree was removed.Two River residents needed a short memory, though, as another nor’easter rolled through New Jersey on Wednesday, dropping inches of snow and bringing in more flooding and windy conditions.This article was first published in the March 8-15, 2018 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

Mallards Team of the Week — Team Hatrick Swayze

first_imgIt sure looked easy on paper, and on the scoreboard.Team Hat-Trick Swayze coasted to the Co-Ed Open Division crown at the Nelson Youth Soccer Winter Tournament held during the holidays at the Indoor Facility on Cedar Street. The Team cruised to the title in the three-team open division.Mallard’s Source for sports would like to salute the squad with Team of the Week honours.last_img

Saints remain in BCIHL hunt after weekend split with SFU Clan

first_imgThe British Columbia Intercollegiate Hockey League (BCIHL) standings may not have changed much after a weekend series between the Selkirk College Saints and Simon Fraser University Clan, but more seeds were planted for what is shaping up to be a great second half of the season. The first-place Clan escaped a feisty Friday night contest with a 5-3 win, but the Saints responded Saturday night with a 4-2 victory as the two clubs opened the 2017 half of the season with a two-game series before a pair of supportive crowds at the Castlegar & District Recreation Complex.last_img read more