WATCH: Exceptional family friendly home on the market in Drumkeen

first_imgA beautiful family home located in a quiet, scenic area less than 10 minutes from Letterkenny Town is on the market for €285,000.The property is finished to the highest standard with quality fixtures and fittings at every turn. Benefiting from a large detached garage and landscaped garden with external lighting and patio area.Occupying circa 0.6-acre elevated site lovingly finished with compacted Cranford Stone driveway and shelterbelt of treessurrounding the entire perimeter.It will undoubtedly make a beautiful family home and a must-see.You can view the full listing with photos by Joseph Reynolds here!WATCH: Exceptional family friendly home on the market in Drumkeen was last modified: September 22nd, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Mencken’s Law at Work in Science

first_img(Visited 358 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 The intuitive solution to a problem can be actually more harmful than the problem itself.H. L. Mencken said of explanations, “there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.” Here are a couple of examples.The mixed effects of online diversity training (PNAS). Many dread having to undergo “diversity training” at work. Such training, common in corporations and academia, assume that human beings need their attitudes fixed, because politically-incorrect biases have been inherited from the parents or from childhood. What better solution than to hold classes that can teach the offenders to accept “diversity and inclusion” attitudes from leftist elitists who just want to “help” people? Chang et al believe in the value of such training, but they were perplexed to find that results were mixed. In their study of 3,016 people who had undergone the training, a lot of people did not change their attitudes:Although diversity training is commonplace in organizations, the relative scarcity of field experiments testing its effectiveness leaves ambiguity about whether diversity training improves attitudes and behaviors toward women and racial minorities. We present the results of a large field experiment with an international organization testing whether a short online diversity training can affect attitudes and workplace behaviors. Although we find evidence of attitude change and some limited behavior change as a result of our training, our results suggest that the one-off diversity trainings that are commonplace in organizations are not panaceas for remedying bias in the workplace.In particular, the researchers found that such training had “limited efficacy among those groups whose behaviors policymakers are most eager to influence.” The diversity police may just have to resort to old-fashioned methods: electroshock, drugs and lobotomy.Banning exotic leather in fashion hurts snakes and crocodiles in the long run  (Natusch, Webb and Shine, The Conversation). There ought to be a law! The knee-jerk reaction of politicians rushes to the obvious solution: when a resource is threatened, ban all exploitation of it. It’s a big issue in conservation these days when endangered species teeter on the brink of extinction. Is it possible that such actions do more harm than good? Consider this case: ban all exotic leather! Crocodiles are threatened!We are all familiar with the concept of “fake news”: stories that are factually incorrect, but succeed because their message fits well with the recipient’s prior beliefs.We and our colleagues in conservation science warn that a form of this misinformation – so-called “feelgood conservation” – is threatening approaches for wild animal management that have been developed by decades of research.The issue came to a head in February when major UK-based retailer Selfridges announced it would no longer sell “exotic” skins – those of reptile species such as crocodiles, lizards and snakes – in order to protect wild populations from over-exploitation.But this decision is not supported by evidence.As they explain, “feelgood conservation” can backfire, by harming those with an interest in preserving the animals – the local people who sell the skins! Honest sellers (not the poachers who rush in to another country and kill elephants for their ivory or rhinos for their horns and leave) depend for their livelihood on being able to sell crocodile hides for profit. They are not going to deplete their resources. They often work hard to ensure plenty of crocodiles and snakes survive, so that a steady supply can sustain their business.How can this be? Isn’t conserving animals better than killing them for products? What do these guys mean that stopping trade in exotic skins will be a disaster for the animals themselves? Isn’t this a sleazy business? Think like a businessman here:Actually, no. You have to look past the fate of the individual animal and consider the future of the species. Commercial harvesting gives local people – often very poor people – a direct financial incentive to conserve reptile populations and the habitats upon which they depend.If lizards, snakes and (especially) crocodiles aren’t worth money to you, why would you want to keep them around, or to protect the forests and swamps that house them?The three conservationists end by saying the proposed cure is worse than the disease: “The ban announced by Selfridges is a disastrous move that could imperil some of the world’s most spectacular wild animals and alienate the people living with them.”The lesson is that critical thinking means opening one’s mind to think beyond the solutions that look clear, simple, and wrongI remember a “diversity training” quiz that everyone at NASA/JPL had to take after the lab opened a “Diversity and Inclusion” department. The quiz was dressed up in cutesy cartoons, explaining things like why you shouldn’t call your holiday party a “Christmas Party” because it might offend somebody. Most people I spoke with thought the exercise was stupid. It was demeaning and insulted their intelligence. And since each quiz item only allowed one right answer, it smelled elitist, not allowing any rational discussion about any of the multiple-choice questions, but demanding conformity of thought. Who were these do-gooders over in another building telling us how to behave, as if we didn’t already know? And what happens if we answer incorrectly? Do we get put on a suspicion list? One can see multiple ways that this “feelgood” exercise could have aroused more strife than inclusion.The “best” answer was to expunge all traces of Christmas. Exercise: Apply this lesson to current worries of today: climate change, fossil fuels, renewable energy, endangered species, national monuments, foreign aid, etc. Just as critical thinking must not jump to the simple solution, it must not also leap to the opposite conclusion. People and their politicians must learn to think past the “feelgood” response and consider the long-term effects of their choices. Sometimes the poorest people suffer the most.last_img read more

‘Compensate us, don’t treat us as criminals’

first_imgOn a hazy Monday morning, Jitender, 42, is doing the rounds of his five-acre field at Sonipat’s Barona village off the Kundli-Manesar-Palwal Expressway, bordering the national capital. He hopes his crop, the ‘Pusa 1121’ variety of basmati rice, would be ready for harvest in the next couple of days.Farmers in and around his village mostly grew basmati rice and harvested the crop manually, he said. “The grain of basmati is damaged during mechanised harvesting and fetches a lower price. We therefore harvest using labour, though it costs a little extra,” said Mr. Jitender. Farmers, he said, make up for it by selling parali (the upper part of paddy cut during harvest). He claimed that incidents of paddy stubble burning in and around his village have virtually stopped over the past two years because of the growing demand for parali as fodder. The parali usually fetches a farmer ₹2,000-₹3,000 per acre. “The stubble is mixed in the field while preparing the land for the next crop,” said Mr. Jitender.The region comprising Jhajjar, Sonipat, Panipat, and Jind districts, mostly growing basmati varieties, account for only 20-30% of stubble burning incidents; the majority of fires are reported from Kaithal, Kurukshetra, Karnal and Yamuna Nagar districts — better known as the “rice bowl” of Haryana. The farmers in this region prefer high-yielding ‘PR’ variety because of easy availability of water and the harvesting is done through combine harvesters. The removal of stalk and straw left in the field is a labour-intensive process. Watch | Stubble burning: M.S. Swaminathan’s solution Stubble burning: M.S. Swaminathan’s solutionVolume 90%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9Live00:0001:3701:37  center_img Combine harvestingMalkeet Singh of Landi village in Kurukshetra said small farmers could not afford to incur three-four times the usual cost to prepare the field for the next crop after combine harvesting and preferred to set the stalk and the straw on fire. “Instead of treating the farmers as criminals and registering a case for burning crop residue, the government should compensate us. The inputs cost of farming has increased several fold over the years, but the price for paddy has reduced to half. The farmer is well aware of the consequences, but it is cost-effective for him to burn [the stubble],” said Mr. Malkeet.Rajinder Singh, president, Haryana Gyan Vigyan Samiti, Karnal, who is working with farmers of around a dozen villages in his area to combat stubble burning, said the government must link cutting of paddy stalk and clearing of fields after combine harvesting with the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme (MGNREGS) to deal with the problem effectively.“It will be a win-win situation for all. The labourers would get work under the MGNREGS and the stubble burning would stop,” he said.Hans Raj of Firozpur Bangar village in Sonipat said the farmers were an easy target to blame for air pollution, but industries and vehicles were responsible for the prevailing situation in Delhi-NCR and the National Capital Region.“Farmers burning the crop residue is mostly in Punjab and Lahore in Pakistan. There are very few instances in Haryana,” he said, adding that parali was, in fact, in short supply in his village.Local parali trader Gopi said the paddy residue is in huge demand in dairies and cowsheds and is also used for packaging purposes. He said he bought the parali from around a dozen villages in Kharkhoda area of Sonipat and not a single instance of crop burning was reported there this year. “Why would the farmer burn when he can make good money out of it,” he asked.“With the farmers failing to fetch adequate price for their produce, ₹3,000 per acre for parali is a welcome money for them,” said Shamsher Singh, from the neighbouring Saidpur village.last_img read more