LONGSHOT ST. JOE BAY MAKES IT LOOK EASY AS HE TAKES GRADE II, $200,000 SAN CARLOS STAKES BY THREE LENGTHS UNDER A COMEBACKING ESPINOZA

first_imgLONGSHOT ST. JOE BAY MAKES IT LOOK EASY AS HE TAKES GRADE II, $200,000 SAN CARLOS STAKES BY THREE LENGTHS UNDER A COMEBACKING ESPINOZA; TRAINED BY SADLER, 7-YEAR-OLD GELDING GETS SEVEN FURLONS IN 1:24.06 ARCADIA, Calif. (March 30, 2019)–While John Sadler came out on the wrong end of one of the most excruciating photos of his training career a race earlier, he endured no such trepidation in the Grade II, $200,000 San Carlos Stakes at Santa Anita on Saturday, as Hronis Racing’s longshot St. Joe Bay led gate to wire to win by three lengths under comebacking Victor Espinoza.  A three-time Kentucky Derby winner and member of racing’s Hall of Fame, Espinoza registered his first win since going to the sidelines with a broken neck this past summer at Del Mar as St. Joe Bay stopped the clock for seven furlongs in 1:24.06.A two-time graded stakes winner at age five, 7-year-old St. Joe Bay, who was claimed for $62,500 seven starts back on May 28 of last year, out-footed 6-5 favorite Ax Man for the early lead and was in command throughout and somewhat assuaged a desperate nose defeat sustained minutes earlier by his stablemate Catapult, in the Grade I Frank E. Kilroe Mile.Off at 15-1 in a field of seven older horses, St. Joe Bay paid $33.60, $14.20 and $7.40.In registering his third career graded victory, he picked up $120,000 for the win, increasing his earnings to $734,515.  He now has an overall mark of 36-7-7-6.Dr. Dorr, who assumed the mantle of “the other Baffert,” when compared to his heavily backed stablemate Ax Man, shifted to the rail while next to last three furlongs from home and make a solid run through the lane to finish second, 1 ¼  lengths in front of Kanthaka.Ridden by Tyler Baze, Dr. Dorr was off at 6-1 and paid $8.60 and $5.60.The second choice at 5-2, Kanthaka, who was ridden by Rafael Bejarano, finished 3 ¼ lengths clear of Solid Wager and paid $3.60 to show.Ax Man, with Drayden Van Dyke up, checked in fifth.Fractions on the race were 22.45, 45.22 and 1:10.41.last_img read more

Give cat for hare and other expressions with historical explanation

first_imgThe phrases made, popularly known sayings that express a truth based on common sense or experience, are often used to give advice or qualify a situation. However, and although we use them regularly, we do not know the origin of these sayings. In this article we explain the most commonly used phrases:Be two candlesWe can use this phrase made in several ways, but in any of them it refers to the lack of something. It is believed that it can come from the timbas of cards in which the bank had a candle on each side of the table to be able to count the money. Therefore, “leaving it with two candles” would mean being bankrupt and having nothing. Throw the house out the windowIt is said that someone “throws the house out of the window” when succumbing to large expenses, higher than what they used to. The expression stems from the custom that existed in the nineteenth century to literally throw furniture out of the window when someone touched the National Lottery in Spain. Go punchingWhen dismissing someone with some disregard or sentencing a discussion that we do not fully agree with, we use “go to hell.” A phrase made dating back to ancient times, where the “freaks” were the embroideries of the nearest part of the sleeve. These ornaments were made by hand with thread; a very delicate work that implies a lot of patience and money. Like Pedro for his houseWhen we talk about “walking like Pedro through his house” we mean a person who moves comfortably and not always well received in a place that is not his own. Its origin could go back to the old forgotten sayings that say: “Something goes from Peter to Peter” or “Well Peter is in Rome, even if he doesn’t eat”. All of them to indicate that “Pedro” is the name given to any individual to personalize phrases or popular sayings. Peter, in his figurative sense, seems to represent the master of a house, as if it were the relation of the Christian words according to which Saint Peter was the cornerstone or the first stone of the house of God.Take for a rideLiterature is full of allusions, many of them ironic, about the value of the food offered at the inns and inns. It was so much the discredit of this type of resting places that a kind of “exorcism” became habitual among diners that recited: “If you are a kid, keep fried; if you are a cat, jump to the plate”. And although this never served to demonstrate the true fame of the inn, it gave rise to the expression “give cat for a hare” that we know today.The third time luckyWhat is meant by this proverbial phrase is that the desired end is reached on the third attempt. But its origin is not so clear: some experts find in the criminal law of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in which the death penalty was imposed on the third theft. Others point out that the expression has been taken from “the melee fight” that goes to three falls. Known for expressing a truth based on common sense or experienceThey are used to give advice or sentence in their figurative or metaphorical senselast_img read more