Rugby Book Review – Expert Guide to Sevens

first_imgBUY IT AT:  greenstarmedia.net RRP:  £37  PUBLISHED BY:  Green Star MediaGot a rugby book or DVD you’d like us to review in the Armchair Zone? Email [email protected] article appeared in the July 2010 issue of Rugby World Magazine TAGS: Book Review England V Argentina Sevens in Wellington Sevens coaching manuals are somewhat thin on the ground, partly because the majority of amateur players are happy to play the sport off the cuff. Colin Hillman, the policeman who played for and coached Wales Sevens, understood that a few basic principles couldgo a long way and was in the process of writing this expert guide when he died, aged just 46, in July last year.His work wasn’t wasted as Dan Cottrell finished what Hillman had started, delivering a guide that will serve all sevens players well. Many of the leading sevens coaches contribute, with Mike Friday especially prevalent as he offers seven drills to use fora “world-class session in two hours” and his rules for picking a balanced squad.If pure gas is non negotiable, it’s possible to defeat quicker opponents. Indeed, Joe Lydon, another former England Sevens coach, admits that the Manchester Commonwealth Games was a big learning curve for him: “I picked a squad to play sevens. Titch (New Zealand coach Gordon Tietjens) picked a squad to play sevens on a narrow short pitch. They won, we didn’t.”In general, quicker teams should compress their attack to give the speedsters more space, while slower but more physical teams should take contact to create offside lines and suck opponents in.Key skills and techniques, attack and defence, tactics and set-pieces (under Friday, England used a six-man lineout to score from a maul) are all explored in depth. Assimilate all this and even your ragtag sevens outfit from The Dog & Duck will have something about them!RW RATING 4/5 LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Do you want to buy the issue of Rugby World in which this article appeared? Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visit http://mags-uk.com/ipcOr perhaps you’d like a digital version of the magazine delivered direct to your PC, MAC or Ipad? If so click here.last_img read more

France 28 Wales 9 – The Rugby World Player Ratings

first_imgFrance’s scrum half Morgan Parra dives to stop Wales N°8 Ryan Jones during the 6Nations rugby union match France vs. Wales on March 19, 2011 at the Stade de France in Saint-Denis, north of Paris. AFP PHOTO / MARTIN BUREAU (Photo credit should read MARTIN BUREAU/AFP/Getty Images) Winging in: Vincent Clerc sneaks over for France’s third tryMaxime Medard 68 Few dangerous runs but not as effective as he has been.Vincent Clerc 78 Great reactions to score his try and came close to adding another.David Marty 74 Nice touches and distribution but little opportunity to attack in space.Damien Traille 76 Solid midfield presence – stopped Wales centres making inroads.Alexis Palisson 68 Ball didn’t come his way often so couldn’t show his talents.Francois Trinh-Duc 75 Lovely chip to set up Clerc try – controlled attacking game well.Morgan Parra 72 Few wayward kicks at goal but otherwise a good performance.Thomas Domingo 68 Pinged a couple of times at the scrum but worked hard at closequarters.William Servat 73 Another who was solid in defence, doing his duty in the tight.Nicolas Mas 76 Got the better of James and even appeared on for a second cameo late on. Jonathan Davies 67 Metres from scoring in second half but mainly called into defensive duty.George North 71 Lovely run from deep late on showed potential of this teenager’s ability.James Hook 62 Chargeodwn of his kick led to second French try and yellow-carded for late tackle.Mike Phillips 64 Under pressure at contact from French back row and got caught a couple of times.Paul James 63 Mixed fortunes at scrum and not as present in loose as he has been.Matthew Rees 74 Another strong display – made tackles a hooker shouldn’t be able to. Running man: George North showed his potential with a late breakLee Byrne 59 One kick straight to touch and mistake under high ball marred performance.Leigh Halfpenny 66 Ankle tap prevented first-half try but often runs too laterally.Jamie Roberts 72 Powerful run through midfield late on, used size effectively in attack and defence. Lock stock: Man of the Match Lionel Nallet runs in his second tryJulien Pierre 81 A workhorse display – his chargedown led to Nallet’s second try.Lionel Nallet 84 Two tries is a rarity for a second row – and he worked hard for them.Thierry Dusautoir 79 Hounded Phillips around breakdown and generally made nuisance of himself.Julien Bonnaire 74 Not as prominent as the other back-rowers but good work-rate nonetheless.Imanol Harinordoquy 78 A relatively quiet display by his standards but still influential.WALES LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS WALES HAD the chance to lift the Six Nations title in Paris after England’s defeat to Ireland, but they never came anywhere near securing the 37-point winning margin required. It was a game littered with errors at the Stade de France – there were spilt balls and turnovers aplenty – but Les Bleus bounced back from last week’s loss in Rome to score three opportunistic tries and easily see off the Welsh. In doing so they clinched second spot in the championship table and condemned Wales to fourth – but who sizzled in Paris and who’s washed up?FRANCE Star man: Ryan Jones stood out for WalesAdam Jones 68 Wouldn’t have known he’d been out injured so long given this display.Bradley Davies 66 Lost ball a couple of times in contact but impeccable work ethic.Alun Wyn Jones 68 Showed good reactions to pounce on loose ball and defended well.Dan Lydiate 75 Put himself about in defence – drives people back in tackle.Sam Warburton 65 Had to leave field early on and he was missed at the breakdown.Ryan Jones 80 Huge work-rate as a carrier and tackler – stood out in losing team.THE KEY0 – Should never play for this team again10 – Shocker – lucky to get picked again this season20 – Out of his depth30 – Did one or two things right – must improve40 – Willing but woeful50 – Minimum requirement for  a professional – average60 – Solid effort and a decent performance70 – Made key contributions and guaranteed his place for next time80 – Superb – should give himself a pat on the back 90 – A personal best – his greatest game ever100 – Faultless – no one could play a better game in this positionlast_img read more

Daily news from New Zealand – 21 October – Video

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The Wallabies may have come third, but they have lost Quade Cooper for at least six monthsOn today’s RWC Daily we have reaction to Australia’s victory over Wales in the Bronze Final at Eden Park. Plus we ask members of the New Zealand and French media for their predictions for Sunday’s Final. AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND – OCTOBER 21: (L-R) Tatafu Polota-Nau, Radike Samo, Quade Cooper, David Pocock and James Horwill of the Wallabies look on after the 2011 IRB Rugby World Cup bronze final match between Wales and Australia at Eden Park on October 21, 2011 in Auckland, New Zealand. (Photo by Hannah Johnston/Getty Images)last_img read more

Five Lions ‘bolters’ to tour Australia

first_imgBATH, ENGLAND – FEBRUARY 18: Jim Hamilton of Gloucester looks on during the Aviva Premiership match between Bath and Gloucester at the Recreation Ground on February 18, 2012 in Bath, England. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) England’s favourite son is entering his twilight years, but that doesn’t mean that the lure of a final swansong with the Lions is not on his wishlist. The stumbling block for Wilkinson, as it will prove to be for Gethin Jenkins, Steffon Armitage and others, is the clash of dates between the beginning of the Lions tour and the final of the Top 14. If injuries occur to the front runners for the No 10 shirt, then Wilkinson may well get the call. It would be a fitting conclusion for one of the game’s greatest playersDan Biggar (Ospreys and Wales)Dan Biggar has hit critics, even among the Ospreys faithful, but no one can knock his prodigious point scoring ability. Many forget that Biggar is still only 22, three years younger than Rhys Priestland, and against Leicester Tigers at Welford Road a week ago he showed his true class. Accurate kicking at goal and producing some moments of brilliant distribution, he has thrown himself back into contention for the Wales 10 jersey after Priestland’s consistency dipped in Australia over the summer. For now he remains an outsider, but if he continues to perform for the Ospreys domestically and on the European stage then he make creep into the selection plans of Warren Gatland and company.Steffon Armitage (Toulon and England) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The enforcer: Jim Hamilton’s aggression could be key against Australia’s packby Ben ColesEVERY FOUR years, a player not considered for the Lions tour suddenly finds themselves on the plane, regardless of Test experience or age. Ahead of the British & Irish Lions tour to Australia next summer, here are five potential ‘bolters’:Paul Marshall (Ulster)Very impressive in Ulster’s bonus point win over Castres in the Heineken Cup, Marshall first made an impact in last season’s competition when his try secured a bonus point for Ulster against Leicester Tigers at Ravenhill. Blessed with great pace, Marshall’s distribution skills are also excellent, making his inclusion from the Ireland squad all the more surprising. The Heineken Cup will be his platform to shine over the coming months as he fights with Ruan Pienaar for selection, but do not rule out seeing him on the plane.Jim Hamilton (Gloucester and Scotland)Being captain seems to suit Hamilton, a beast of a lock forward who despite the odd moment of irrational aggression, is adored by the Kingsholm faithful. A strong competitor in the lineout, Hamilton was absent for Scotland’s shock win against Australia back in the summer and would love an opportunity to prove what he can do against the Green & Gold. If the Lions are looking for a warrior, Hamilton is their man.Jonny Wilkinson (Toulon and England) Unavailable for England this November, Armitage was voted as the best player in the Top 14 by readers of Midi Olympique last season, the finest accolade around for an individual player in France’s top flight. More importantly, he was also the first Englishman to win the award. These feats however are not enough for Armitage to be named in the England squad, due to his availability outside of IRB windows for training camps. Like Wilkinson, he may well be competing in the Top 14 Final when the Lions face the Barbarians in Hong Kong, but his brilliant form is both undeniable and should be impossible to ignore.Follow Ben Coles on Twitter @bencoles_last_img read more

Super Rugby Bulls and their fallen empire

first_img Super Rugby Bulls and their fallen empireThe late withdrawal of Victor Matfield from the Bulls head coach race, and the subsequent appointment of Pote Human on 12 December, prompted new questions and concerns over the state of affairs at the once-mighty franchise.The three-time Super Rugby champions have been in steady decline since 2011. What transpired in 2018, however – from the last-place finish in the South African conference to the laboured and ultimately unsuccessful process to secure a like-for-like successor to coach John Mitchell – served to highlight the severity of the situation at Loftus Versfeld.The Bulls are still searching for solutions to various problems at all levels of the game.In 2012, lock Juandré Kruger told SA Rugby magazine that most young South African forwards viewed a stint with the Bulls as a springboard to Springbok selection – and he was right in the sense that he graduated to the national side a few months after representing the Bulls in that 2012 Super Rugby tournament. Nowadays, the union doesn’t command the same respect and pull.Coaches, players and even administrators are happy to seek opportunities elsewhere, as standards have slumped to an alarming low. Pumas coach Jimmy Stonehouse, considered a front-runner for the head coach post at one point last year, bemoaned the manner in which the administration went about recruiting a replacement for Mitchell and opted to withdraw. Kings coach Deon Davids, who has ambitions to coach one of the traditional powerhouses and eventually the Boks, was overlooked.Former Bok and Bulls scrum-half Fourie du Preez publicly criticised the decisions made by the administration since 2011, and denied that he would be taking up an assistant coach position alongside Matfield. At the 11th hour, Matfield turned the Bulls down, citing family commitments and ‘job insecurity’ as the reasons for leaving his beloved team – whom he captained to three titles between 2007 and 2010 – in the lurch.Related: Super Rugby players to watchThe Bulls and SA Rugby moved quickly to talk up the involvement of Rassie Erasmus at the franchise in 2019, which led to more questions regarding the Bok coach’s focus on one particular franchise. That announcement did little to soften the blows of Du Preez’s words and Matfield’s decision, though. The Bulls were, and still are, in dire straits. Blue Bulls president Willem Strauss, new director of rugby Alan Zondagh and Human himself made all the right noises when they fronted the media at Loftus in mid-December. However, there was no getting around the fact that the late appointment had compromised the team before its first fixture against the Stormers on 16 February.The Bulls’ desperate decision to elevate an assistant coach is similar to the call made by the Stormers bosses when Eddie Jones left the Cape franchise after only a week at the helm in late 2015. Robbie Fleck was promoted and a move to recruit Mitchell was blocked. One could make a solid argument – based on the shocking results between 2016 and 2018 – that the Stormers are worse off now than they were during the latter years of Allister Coetzee’s tenure.In the luke-warm seat: Bulls boss Pote Human (Getty Images)South African rugby fans expect more from the Bulls, though. There was a time when the Bulls were recognised as one of the top franchises on the planet. Then coach Heyneke Meyer put the necessary structures in place during the early-2000s, and the union reaped significant rewards in the form of five Currie Cups and three Super Rugby titles.The set-up at Loftus was the envy of every South African union. When Meyer and a host of coaches and support staff – not least of all Ian Schwartz, who played a key role in contracting players to the Bulls during that golden era – joined the Boks in 2012, the means to innovate and stay ahead of the chasing pack went with them.Du Preez summed it up best in his complaint to the media late last year.“The current structures at the Bulls make success highly unlikely,” he told Netwerk24. “Poor decision-making has seen the Bulls stagnate from one of the best teams to an average side and no one has taken responsibility for that decline.”The results achieved between 2011 and 2018 paint a bleak picture. The Bulls have reached the Super Rugby playoffs on just two occasions over the past eight seasons. They haven’t won a knockout game since 2010. There was a time when the Bulls relished the big occasion and led the way in terms of mental strength. These days, they lack the ability to compete abroad and challenge the New Zealand teams on a regular basis.Since 2014, the Bulls have lost 19 out of 21 overseas matches – a record that includes historic losses to the Sunwolves in Asia and the Jaguares in Argentina. Much was made about their win over the Hurricanes in Pretoria last season, but more should be read into the fact they’ve lost 23 out of 30 matches against Kiwi opposition since 2011 and haven’t won a game on New Zealand soil since 2013.All tied up: Lood De Jager takes contact against the Jaguares (Getty Images)Many of the South African franchises, and indeed the Boks, have battled to win overseas in recent times. The Lions, however, have enjoyed success locally as far as Super Rugby is concerned. Together, the Sharks and Western Province have accounted for six of the last nine Currie Cup titles. But the Bulls have been consistently poor across both competitions. They have progressed to one domestic final – which they lost to the Cheetahs in 2016 – since last winning the title in 2009.Personnel is part of the problem. The Bulls’ recruitment strategy and their inability to retain promising players have been heavily criticised. The pressure is on men like Zondagh, the new director of rugby, to succeed where others have failed.“I’ve worked with young players for many years and I think the most important thing at a union or franchise like this is the Super Rugby team,’ the former WP coach said. ‘And if we get young players into our system, we have to develop them in such a way that they are knocking on the Super Rugby door every year. We have to look at our systems and get to the point where our young players break into the Super Rugby squad. That is my main job.“You can get the best players from school, but if you don’t work with them properly and develop them continuously, they are not going to be the players you want them to be by the time they get to professional rugby. It takes a player about five years before he gets to senior rugby. So you have to invest that amount of time into most players. And I’m not talking about the Handré Pollards, Pat Lambies and Curwin Bosches. Most of the time it’s the fly-halves who get into senior ranks quicker. I’m talking about the rest of the boys.”Related: South Africa’s fixtures, group and guide for Rugby World Cup 2019The previous Bulls coaches must take some responsibility for the results recorded since 2011. Frans Ludeke, who was at the helm when the Bulls won back-to-back titles, was eventually forced out after his side finished ninth in the 2015 standings. Nollis Marais’ side made history for all the wrong reasons – Crusaders coach Scott Robertson was almost apologetic after the Kiwi giants put 10 tries past the Bulls in the 62-24 win at Loftus in 2017. While Robertson criticised the fitness of the South African teams in general, it was clear the Bulls wanted for tempo and accuracy in subsequent matches. Mitchell attempted to address this problem before the 2018 season, and yet the side still failed to produce 80-minute performances and ultimately finished last in the South African conference.Bright spot: Jesse Kriel scores against the Stormers this season (Getty Images)The Bulls used to be one of the most feared teams in Super Rugby as far as physicality was concerned. In the early-2000s, they took their game further, using their powerful forwards and pinpoint kicking game to create opportunities for backs like Bryan Habana.While many maintained their perceptions about a ‘limited’ and ‘conservative’ Bulls team, the statistics told a different story. The Bulls scored the most tries in 2007, the most points in 2009 and the most points and tries in 2010. They stayed true to their physical identity, but certainly weren’t limited by it.The Bulls side that’s been on show over the past few seasons has lacked a sense of identity. Their defence has been particularly poor (see sidebar) and for all the hype, their attack has ranged from mediocre to dire if tries and points are the measurement. These defensive and attacking failures can be linked to the decline of their physical approach as well as the tactical kicking inaccuracies. Until they recruit the right players and implement the right structures and game plan, they will continue to languish in the bottom half of the Super Rugby table.Transformation is yet another area that requires dramatic improvement. All six of South Africa’s franchises will be expected to field teams that are 50% black in 2019. It will be a big ask for teams like the Bulls and the Lions, who have been the worst performers in this department since the Strategic Transformation Plan was introduced in late 2014.The Bulls backed just four players of colour to start more than five games in 2018 – four fewer than the Cheetahs, Sharks and Stormers and two fewer than the Lions. The recruitment and development of promising black players must be viewed as a priority, sooner rather than later. There will always be those who blame poor results on the drive to meet these targets. However, the Bulls finished last in the South African conference despite being the least transformed side.It was hoped that Mitchell would usher in a new era when he arrived in late-2017. His comments about the state of the franchise, however, confirmed that the problems cannot be fixed overnight.It remains to be seen whether Zondagh can address the issues around recruitment and development, and whether Human – who was never the first choice as coach – can get the Super Rugby side back on the right tactical path. Indeed, it remains to be seen who will coach the side in 2020, and whether we will be having the same conversation again in a year’s time. Until that is decided, all talk of a revival and a realistic title assault is premature. Crestfallen: The Bulls suffer defeat at the hands of Japan’s Sunwolves in April 2017 (Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img A once-great Bulls franchise faces a fight for respect and relevance in 2019, writes Jon Cardinelli. This article first appeared in the February 2019 issue of SA Rugby magazine. This article first appeared in the February 2019 issue of SA Rugby magazine.Don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

Five of the Best Rugby World Cup Semi-finals

first_imgNew Zealand meanwhile had looked in terrifying form thanks to the emergence of a certain Jonah Lomu, and had swept aside Ireland, Wales and Scotland already. Then they demolished England – although the scoreline makes it look closer than it truly was.The madness began early. Lomu picked up a bouncing ball, avoided a flailing Will Carling, before half-stumbling, half-flattening Mike Catt to score one of the great World Cup tries.Josh Kronfeld would finish a brilliant move moments later to make it 12-0, and the game was already almost over as a contest.No 8 Zinzan Brooke scoring a 45m drop-goal rubbed salt into the wound. Lomu would score again, giving the All Blacks 25 points in as many minutes, before adding to his tally soon after half-time to bring up a hat-trick.England, to their credit, managed to score four tries in the last half-hour of the game courtesy of Carling and Rory Underwood, but the overwhelming feeling was that New Zealand had their eyes on the final. Tries from Graeme Bachop and a fourth for Lomu meant the result was never in doubt.Not a classic for its tense nature or a close finish, but for the birth of Lomu as a global superstar.France 43-31 New Zealand, 1999 Twickenham One of the most famous World Cup matches of all time. Having lost the final in 1995, New Zealand once again possessed a star-studded back-line boasting Lomu, Christian Cullen, Tana Umaga and Jeff Wilson.Yet France defeated them with a performance of dazzling brilliance, overcoming a 14-point deficit to reach their second final. Fly-half Christophe Lamaison was responsible for kick-starting his side’s comeback, knocking over two drop-goals before his speculative chip found Christophe Dominici, the diminutive winger flying in under the posts.New Zealand were shell-shocked, unable to believe that a World Cup final they’d been strolling towards seemed to be accelerating off into the distance. Lamaison took full advantage of a rapidly freezing opposition, chipping once more into the All Blacks backfield, and Richard Dourthe gathered to score a try that put France 12 points up.Philippe Bernat-Salles traded tries with Wilson, but the All Blacks never threatened a comeback. France had improbably, brilliantly, sumptuously triumphed.South Africa 18-20 New Zealand, 2015 Twickenham South Africa v New Zealand is potentially the biggest rivalry in world rugby, and the two sides played out another classic here. South African physicality was matched by an intensity that the All Blacks rarely need to reach, as New Zealand pulled themselves from the quagmire to triumph in an attritional epic.The All Blacks went 7-3 ahead early as sumptuous offloading from Richie McCaw gave Jerome Kaino some space on the right wing. The blindside made no mistake, flicking away would be tacklers like a giant with a fly swat to give his side the lead.But South Africa came roaring back into the game, as four first-half Handré Pollard penalties gave them a deserved 12-7 half-time lead.A Dan Carter drop-goal brought New Zealand to within a penalty, before Ma’a Nonu created space for Beauden Barrett to slide over in the corner. With the conversion added and the two sides swapping penalties the All Blacks suddenly led 20-15.With ten minutes left Pat Lambie brought the gap back to two, but South Africa wasted an attacking lineout and New Zealand’s discipline reappeared as they held on to win by the barest of margins. Five of the Best Rugby World Cup Semi-finalsThe World Cup semi-finals are looming and they look as if they could be classics. New Zealand will face an England side they’ve hardly been exposed to over the past four years, while Wales will attempt to overcome South African power to reach their first World Cup final.But what have been the great semi-finals of yesteryear? This stage of the competition is often known for tight and tense affairs – but there have been plenty of thrills too. Here’s a look at five of the best World Cup semi-finals…Australia 24-30 France, 1987 Sydney The last hurrah of the great French sides of the 1980s, it could be argued that the World Cup’s greatest semi-final was the first one ever played.France met Australia in Sydney, the latter with the core of the side that would win the tournament in 1991, and sporting a half-back combination of Nick Farr-Jones and Michael Lynagh as well as David Campese at full-back.Australia flew into an early 9-0 lead, before French lock Alain Lorieux, a former firefighter, ripped the ball away from a lineout to crash over in the corner, with Didier Camberabero adding the conversion. Early in the second half legendary centre Philippe Sella sliced though the Australian defence against the grain to put les Bleus into the lead 12-9.The game quickly became a see-saw battle, as brilliant sidestepping from Lynagh set up Campese to put Australia back in the lead.Serge Blanco then released Patrice Lagisquet for a try down the left wing, before David Codey scored for Australia, despite suspicions of a knock-on.Penalties for each team and the score was 24-24 as the game approached its denouement. Then came the decisive moment.Starting from deep, Lagisquet kicked ahead, his Garryowen gathered by the onrushing French forward pack. The ball passed rapidly through the hands of 11 players before Blanco finished in the corner to score one of the great counter-attacking tries and send France into the World Cup final.South Africa 19-15 France, 1995 Durban Eight years later and France would lose a semi-final to hosts South Africa in controversial circumstances. The game was delayed by an hour after apocalyptic rainfall. In any ordinary situation it would have been called off, with referee Derek Bevan concerned about a scrum collapsing in deep standing water.As per the rules of the tournament, if the game was unable to start France would have gone through based on their superior disciplinary record.Instead, local women were sent onto the field with brooms and neighbouring Durban Country Club provided pumps, so eventually the game was played.Clearing the water: Local women help out before the game (Getty Images)A pushover try from Ruben Kruger seemed to have sealed the match for the Springboks, as they led 19-15 with moments left after Joel Stransky and French counterpart Thierry Lacroix had swapped penalties all evening.Related: Remembering the wettest game in Rugby World Cup historyHowever, controversy was to rear its head again, as Abdel Benazzi had a late try disallowed. Despite protestations it was not given and South Africa would go on to stun the All Blacks in the final.England 29-45 New Zealand, 1995 Cape Town The second semi-final in 1995, played a day later in bright Newlands sunshine, was also an iconic affair. England had defeated Australia in the quarters thanks to a late Rob Andrew drop-goal, and were bidding to reach their second consecutive World Cup final. Keep track of events in Japan via our Rugby World Cup homepage.Follow Rugby World magazine on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. French lesson: Christophe Dominici beats Andrew Mehrtens to score a try in 1999 (Getty Images) center_img Ahead of this weekend’s matches, Jacob Whitehead has picked out a handful of super semi-finals LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

The Problems With CBD Oil Explained

first_imgWe find out about research done by Liverpool John Moores University LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. “If we go back about five years, I had players I worked with asking me about CBD,” says Graeme Close, professor of Human Physiology at Liverpool John Moores University and nutrition consultant with England Rugby.“Five years ago it was quite an easy conversation: ‘It may be useful, it may not – I didn’t know much about it – but it’s prohibited by WADA (the World Anti-Doping Agency)’.“Then in 2018 they removed it (from the banned list). As an academic/practitioner, that was not a good enough answer anymore.“The starting point for me was with all the anecdotes you hear about how often it’s being used, (we had to) assess as many pro rugby players as we could, how prevalent was its use, why are people turning to it, what are the main reasons? How much do they know about it from an anti-doping perspective, and what are the perceived benefits so far?”You may have seen rugby personalities talk about CBD – the cannabinoid found in the hemp strain of cannabis that has been linked to enhanced recovery, better sleep, relief with muscle soreness. Yet as was suggested by Dr Mark Ware in our companion piece, Chronic Pain, Cannabis and Rugby, with quality research “there is nothing on human pain and CBD. It’s astonishing that we don’t have data on that.”Read next: CHRONIC PAIN, CANNABIS AND RUGBYSo in August, Close, his colleague Andreas Kasper and LJMU released the results from a study they had done that highlighted the high prevalence of CBD use among professional rugby players, despite warnings that there are still risks attached to its use. They found 26% of professional players surveyed (517 professional league and union players from UK-based competitions) had tried CBD oil and 8% were currently using it.Worryingly, the team at LJMU found that only 16% of professionals surveyed had sought advice from trained sport nutritionists. A whopping 73% were getting their information from the internet, despite the risks of anti-doping violations.Decision makers: World Anti-Doping Agency (Getty Images)Although not prohibited by WADA, CBD often contains traces of other cannabinoids such as THC (the psychoactive compound tetrahydrocannabinol, the part of cannabis that creates the ‘high’), which is prohibited and illicit in quantities above 1mg per bottle. The real risk is that there is evidence to show that many CBD products have much higher levels of THC than stated on product packaging.Close takes a balanced view. He tells Rugby World: “We published a paper, maybe five years ago now, which basically shows that rugby league players are in pain every day of their life during a competitive season. It subsides as it gets towards the game day but you’re never back down to zero.“What we also know is that with some traditional pain medication (like non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)), even Ibuprofen, if you take it long enough it’s related to stomach ulcers. Then you move on to the opiates like tramadol, and we know that they are addictive. There are problems with players who have openly admitted at the end of their careers to being addicted to opiate-based painkillers.“So if we’ve got something with a side-effect profile that appears to be less than the traditional (painkillers), and the anecdotes suggest it’s effective in pain relief, I do think as academics we’ve got a responsibility to investigate it.“The huge caveat to all that is at the moment it’s still a big anti-doping risk. I do believe it is still too soon for any athlete to be using it. I think people like myself have a responsibility to research it, and if it’s safe and it helps with pain relief and it’s got less side effects, then we have to work together with the authorities to find a way to make it able for athletes to use.”Talking point: CBD products are part of a national discussion (Getty Images)With the need for higher quality control in the field – as with the aforementioned issues with misleading labels – and new products coming out, quality research is imperative. There are different avenues yet to be explored, too.While we may be aware of the reputable brands who have the low levels of THC they claim, there needs to be a study into the possibility of accumulating THC to such a level that a player fails a drug test. Of course the issue is how to go about conducting such studies?As Kasper points out, you cannot use elite athletes as a control group for something like this because you risk them failing a test. Certain amateur competitions come under the WADA code, too. You have to carefully consider who you use.Read next: IS IT TIME TO RETHINK STRENGTH & CONDITIONING IN RUGBY?So is it an exciting time to be looking into this?“If you were to ask me as an academic, with my professor of human physiology at LJMU, is this exciting or worrying, I’d say it’s exciting,” says Close. “We’ve got something here that has got so much potential.“It’s like a skier finding (untouched) white powder snow. You can go and have some fun with it. Who knows what we’re going to find?“You’ve got to remember that the way all this was discovered was people were trying to work out what was going on with cannabis, particularly THC – why was it having all these effects on the human body?“And then we discovered the human endocannabinoid system. There’s a system in place whereby these cannabinoids bind to receptors and have major effects, and then you find a body producing its own endocannabinoids. It’s got so much potential.Elite level: England in action during the Six Nations (Getty Images)“Then you say, ‘Graeme, as consultant nutritionist with England Rugby, is this exciting or worrying?’ I’d say it’s terrifying because it’s a failed drug test waiting to happen!”He again brings up recent studies that showed it’s “the wild west out there”.And in February, the Food Standards Agency (FSA) set a deadline of March 2021 for CBD businesses to provide more information about CBD products and their contents. It also advises the pregnant, breastfeeding or those taking any medication not to consume CBD products, and said healthy adults should take no more than 70mg a day.From the elite sports perspective, Close and his cohorts are keen to get to the bottom of a few key issues: does it actually work, what dose does it work at, and what are the WADA and safety issues related to that? Know all that, they say, and they will be in a much better position to advise athletes.As for the performer, it’s best they seek the advice of professionals away from the testimony of mates, instead of scrolling through the internet. Coming into focus: bottles of CBD oil (Getty Images) TAGS: Investigation last_img read more

Committee hears testimony on same-gender blessings liturgies

first_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Bath, NC July 8, 2012 at 8:13 pm amen! Brian A. MacFarland says: July 8, 2012 at 2:04 am As a happily married straight man in a different-sex relationship I have “had the opportunity to sit down and discuss and do the hard work”–in four Episcopal churches–since the 1970s. It took me decades to overcome my ignorance and fears, but at the age of 60 (50 of those years spent as an active Episcopalian) I now fully embrace same-sex marriage and believe in marriage equality on both theological and justice/equity grounds.To the Rev. Sharon Lewis, the Rev. Danielle Morris, and other opponents of this partial measure–and it is only a partial one until marriage equality is the law of the land as well as the church–I want to say that it is time for the church to be equally loving and accepting to everyone in the world and it is time to stop improperly withholding grace and sacraments out of fear. And perfect Love casts out that fear, as well it should. By Sharon Sheridan Posted Jul 7, 2012 General Convention, July 9, 2012 at 6:57 am Although I am prayerfully moved by the troubles of Anglicans across the globe. I find the reference to the safety of Gays and Lesbians in Muslim countries a red herring. If we, as brothers and sisters in Christ, are to wait for unified global understanding and acceptance of God’s call for justice and freedom of all people then we would have never moved forward on issues related to woman’s rights, slavery, economic justice and human rights. What the Episcopal Church (also an American Tradition) can do is lead on matters of justice and equality and fight violence and oppression against those standards where ever they occur. Same-Sex Blessings Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK July 8, 2012 at 3:24 pm It saddens me that many of the opponents came from Florida, then again, perhaps we should not be surprised. Central Florida does not exactly have a stellar record when it comes to open-mindedness, tolerance, and progress.Perhaps the Rev. Sharon Lewis and the Rev. Danielle Morris should remember that it is that very same kind of tolerance and acceptance that made their ordinations as women possible. I joined the Episcopal Church because it was a beacon of tolerance and it encouraged people to think, to reason and use logic. If those in central Florida want to keep living in the past, let them go join religions that live in the past; there are plenty of them out there.The fact remains — the times, they are a-changin’ — and today’s youth / tomorrow’s churchgoers will no longer tolerate a church that justifies intolerance, or is going to sit on the sidelines and wait for another church to be courageous. The Episcopal Church is too smart for this ‘debate’. Passing A049 is the right thing to do; not passing it is very un-Christ like.And more time, Ms. Lewis; you want more time to think? How about this — the Episcopal Church I attend has dozens of gay couples that have been together for 35+ years. How much longer would you have them wait?The State of Florida is intolerant enough; we do not expect much from them. We do however expect much from the Episcopal Church in Florida; which has an opportunity to be a leader and not a follower of old bad practices, notions, stereotypes, and hypocrisies. I pray that Florida’s Episcopalian leaders will come to their senses and realize that they have an opportunity to be on the right side of history and effect change for generations to come.Perhaps the Florida delegates need to dust of their copies of the Beatitudes and turn off FOX News. July 8, 2012 at 1:47 pm “Meme?” So you don’t watch the secular news much, eh? Google “church attacks in Nigeria.” That will get you started. It isn’t difficult to counter your “meme” claim with one cold, hard fact — that Christians, individually and in churches, male and female, gay and straight, are killed or raped or seriously wounded daily by Muslims for perceived immorality because of their association with us. To mock that — and to degrade the torture and murder of African Christians by comparing it to the lives of GLBTs in America — is either blind or mean-spirited. Perhaps, in some cases, both.If you don’t care about the heterosexual Christians being killed in Africa, one would think you’d at least be concerned about the homosexual Christians being targeted there. And realize that this “culture of death” mentioned for American GLBTs is hyperbole, which doesn’t help your cause. Rector Shreveport, LA July 9, 2012 at 8:01 am Hyperbole, really? Perhaps you’ve had your fingers in your ears over the past few years as the names of young LGBT suicides have filled our news reports.Hyperbole is claiming categorically that there is any causal link between this particular legislation and the violence between Christians and Muslims in other parts of the world. Muslim/Christian enmity is a far more complex issue than that.The hyperbole uttered by Rev. Morris and others of her diocese in their fear-mongering testimony was genuinely appalling. I honestly believe that some people will say nearly anything in order to scapegoat and isolate those with whom they do not agree. July 8, 2012 at 12:18 am It’s interesting. The more I hear the meme about risking the lives of Christians in Muslim countries, I am reminded of Jesus promising that his disciples would suffer horribly because of their faith, and I wonder where Jesus would stand on this. Michael Greene says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Susan Gage says: July 8, 2012 at 3:27 pm The fact is, liturgies are already being used for same-gender weddings. Last month my partner and I travelled to my home state, which has had marriage equality for several years, and were married by an Episcopal priest . Before travelling there we had pre-marriage counseling with our parish priest who coordinated with the priest who married us. We had three liturgies to choose from that are used by the Episcopal Church in that state . Our marriage was recorded in the parish I attended as a small child and was approved by the bishop. A copy is a part of our membership record at our home parish. As far as I know, there was no controversy surrounding our wedding. We were surrounded by our family and friends and received with all the love and support any new couple would get. I know we are extraordinarily blessed to have been able to wed in the church but also know we are not alone. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York July 9, 2012 at 7:56 am Where would Jesus be on this issue? I don’t remember reading in any gospel account where He died for the sins of just the straight, or just the “anything”…If God loves each of us just as we are then who are we to exclude anyone??? Judging is up to God, not me! The Rev. Danielle Morris, deputy from the Diocese of Central Florida, addresses Young Adult Festival member and Duke University student Jonathan York during the Prayer Book, Liturgy and Church Music Committee hearing on Resolution A049 to Authorize Liturgical Resources for Blessing Same-Gender Relationships. ENS Photo/Sharon Sheridan[Episcopal News Service — Indianapolis] Nearly 40 people testified July 7 on General Convention Resolution A049 to Authorize Liturgical Resources for Blessing Same-Gender Relationships.Those testifying alternated between proponents and opponents of the resolution, but supporters outnumbered opponents, at least six of whom came from the Diocese of Central Florida.At the evening’s end, Prayer Book, Liturgy and Church Music Committee bishop Chair George Wayne Smith, bishop of the Diocese of Missouri, commended the speakers. “There was a sense of mutual respect. I’m grateful for that, and I hope we can move forward with that same understanding that we are all of us part of one body, and we are all a part of life in Christ.”Young Adult Festival participant Jonathan York, a sophomore at Duke University, began the evening’s testimony describing the conflict he said many young gay Christians feel.“I am an out and proud young gay man, and I am a Christian. That’s an impossible concept for many people to get their heads around because for so much of the church’s history the terms gay and Christian have been mutually exclusive,” he said.He described gay and lesbian young people who “know that the Spirit is calling them into a deeper experience of Christ” but who have “been told time and again that God hates them. So many gay people feel like they’re being forced to make a choice: They can have their place in their church, or they can have their identity.”He urged General Convention to pass the resolution to show “that they do in fact have a place in God’s home.”Later, the Rev. Danielle Morris of the Diocese of Central Florida began her testimony by addressing York: “You are okay. Jesus loves you, and I would be proud to have you in my church.”But she went on to urge defeat for the resolution, whose passage she said would endanger the lives of Christians in predominantly Muslim countries. “We know people who live in terror of our decision. … Let us sacrifice not the blood of new martyrs but our own personal desires, all for the good and betterment of the world.”“People are already dying,” countered resolution supporter T.J. Geigner, a vistor with the Episcopal Peace Fellowship. “LGBT youth, LGBT couples are dying. They’re being killed by hate crimes. They’re taking their own lives.”“When beliefs create a culture of death … beliefs need to change,” he said.The Rev. Carola von Wrangel, deputy from the Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe, spoke against the resolution, urging the church to wait for discussion of the theology of marriage. “I believe that we are stepping ahead of where we are supposed to be.”The Rev. Sharon Lewis, alternate deputy of the Diocese of Southwest Florida, also urged taking more time.The resolution is more than a “pastoral provision,” she said. “It is really representing a different definition of marriage. … It’s bringing a different definition that we have not even had the opportunity to sit down and discuss and do the hard work we need to do as a church overall. … Please do not do this quickly and so lightly.”Several speakers told personal stories of their own or friends’ relationships, blessings and marriages.“I don’t feel like we’re moving so quickly,” said Marcia Ledford of the Diocese of Michigan. She described her nearly 30-year relationship with her partner and how, when they held a commitment ceremony at a parish in 1992, “we had protesters and threats, death threats for our cleric and our bishop.”The church needs the resolution to pass “because we need to be pastoral for our people within the church,” she said. “We need to send a message outside that this is not some kind of curiosity. This is not some kind of bizarre anomaly. This is about people. I take out the garbage and mow the grass, and Linda does the laundry and cooks. … We pay our taxes. We do everything that a couple does.”The Rev. Dennis Parker, alternate deputy of the Diocese of Oregon, said he and his partner had waited 15 years. “We have made a conscious choice to not celebrate [our] union in front of anyone until my church is willing to bless that relationship.”Should the resolution pass, he predicted, “my bishop has something to do on Saturday morning when we leave.”— Sharon Sheridan is a member of the Episcopal News Service team at General Convention. Human Sexuality, Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Ann-Marie Montague says: Rector Washington, DC July 9, 2012 at 12:15 pm Amen. Justice too long delayed is justice denied. Whether in politcis or religion, it was true for Civil Rights, Women’s Rights, and now Gay Rights. July 8, 2012 at 7:28 am The Church has already done the theology of marriage as it already has a Marriage Rite. Why is it necessary for gay persons to have to have something different. We change a few words in the marriage rite when we know it is not possible for the couple being marriend to have children. Why can’t we just change a few words in the Marriage Rite to acknowledge couples of the same sex? We need to get over ourselves and start treating all people equally, as beloved children of God. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH July 9, 2012 at 12:14 pm Nevertheless, when I met him he had just been named head of the History Department at Yale. That’s a very funny way of critiquing his academic bona fides. Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN Paul Holloway says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Enrique Molina says: July 8, 2012 at 10:43 pm Boswell’s research and findings are seriously questioned by not only theologians, but historians. The man, may he rest in everlasting peace, had an agenda. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls Jim Grenwell says: July 8, 2012 at 8:06 pm AMEN! In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Julia Langdon says: John Kirk says: Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI July 8, 2012 at 4:56 pm “I Am Who I Am” is both gay and straight (as well as lesbian, transgender, bi-sexual, black, white, red, yellow, Islamic, Jewish, Buddhist, Hindu, male, and female). Let us love God with all our heart, with all our soul, with all our mind, and with all our strength. We must pledge to fight against the ignorance, pride, and prejudice that breeds human injustice or partiality of any kind; otherwise we cannot label ourselves followers of Jesus, the Christ. Let us love our neighbors as we love ourselves. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Jon Spangler says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Carl Johengen says: July 9, 2012 at 7:20 am I can’t help but find the comments of the several female clergy who have publically come out against affording same sex couples the benefit of ALL the sacraments of the church to be dishonest at best. These delegates would do well to refer to the convention of 1976 when the same arguments were being used to prevent females from receiving the sacrament of ordination.Yes, many have left the Church because of the female ordination issue, and many will probably leave the Church if full equallity is afforded same sex couples. But I predict a greater exodis, should the Convention allow the clergy from Florida to prevail. Submit a Press Release Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Tags Comments are closed. sarah doremus says: Submit an Event Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska Press Release Service An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Jim Edwards says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT July 8, 2012 at 11:44 am I am a happily married heterosexual male who wants all people to have happy marriages regardless of orientation. I don’t see how Jesus would be opposed to that. There is nothing in the canonical gospels where Jesus opposes same sex relationships. Pass the resolution! To the opponents I say, “get over it.” July 8, 2012 at 1:16 am Thank you for this report on the hearing. I live in the diocese of Florida and I support the adoption of these trial liturgies, and look forward to where the church will go from here. The Episcopal Church that I have known and loved for my lifetime is a church that listens, discerns, and ultimately bends towards justice. I am encouraged by the steps toward fully including the LGBT faithful in the life of the church. It will make us better, stronger, and certainly more reflective of God’s love. David Justin Lynch says: General Convention 2012, Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME July 8, 2012 at 5:07 pm My partner and I are unofficially engaged. I serve as Minister of Music at our parish. Since we cannot marry in Pennsylvania, we plan to marry in a parish in Massachusetts using the BCP’s Marriage Rite with language adjusted as needed. I made the adjustments myself and found that minimal adjustments were needed.I welcome the proposed liturgy as a step in the right (and Rite) direction in states that do not yet have full marriage equality. But in states that do, the marriage rite in the BCP with language adjusted as needed is substantial. There’s no need for further discussion on the issue: you either support inclusion or exclusion. Inclusion is why I joined the Episcopal Church in the first place.As for the churches in less accepting places: “Blessed are they which are persecuted for righteousness’ sake: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.” TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Robert Vogler says: Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR July 9, 2012 at 3:05 pm And amen!My spouse and I were the subjects of a forum on same sex marriage in our parish, during the time when same sex marriage was legal in California in 2008. There was so much fear of stepping on the toes of folks who weren’t even there that our photographer wasn’t even allowed to move around the church, which resulted in lots of pictures of my spouse, but none of me, except for the back of my head. Even though we had both the blessing of our bishop, priest and deacon, I still felt like I was somehow sneaking around.The time for discussion, in my opinion, is past. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Sherman Hesselgrave says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books July 9, 2012 at 10:48 am Who are we kidding here? It is not that Jonathan York needs TEC so much as TEC needs Jonathan York. He and his generation–who largely lack their parents’ prejudices–are holding the cards here. Not Rev. Morris. July 9, 2012 at 11:12 pm Nevertheless, his research and findings are serioiusly questioned by not only theologians, but historians. If you can question the the moral teachings of 2,000 plus years, Dr. Boswell’s findings and the methods by which he reached them are certainly open to the same questioning. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Comments (25) Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL Deacon Lynn Czarniecki says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group July 8, 2012 at 12:22 pm Of course this resolution should be passed. It is way overdue. How can we possibly believe we have the right to withhold from anyone the right to marry? The relationships of LGBT people in our churches are just like my relationship with my husband: full of fun, anguish, hard work, joy, commitment, fulfillment, devotion, struggle, and most of all love. This is MARRIAGE. I feel sick every time I think about gay people being told they cannot experience this, either because of secular law or church law. We are so arrogant. Please, let us, just once “love one another as I have loved you.” Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Joyce Gibb says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Belleville, IL Jon Carl Lewis says: Submit a Job Listing Sandra Koenig says: Tim Staney says: July 8, 2012 at 12:19 am I am very tired of hearing we need to talk more and discuss.My partner and I have been together for over 20 years and had to have a blessing of our relationship because we could not use the word wedding, or anything that would let anyone in our congregation know, but in the end the over 100 people that showed up at the Integrity service all knew why they were there. We have been active participants in our congregation and diocese but yet we need more conversation and thinking time to figure out what?My partner and I deserve the same rights afforded to our counterparts in the heterosexual community, no questions, no thinking, just make it happen for all of us.This is not our whole story but when this topic comes up we hear the same words and nothing happens till the General Convention and we will hear the same words again. Don’t let this happen again. David Ulrich says: V. Tupper Morehead, MD, MDiv, TSSF says: Rector Albany, NY July 8, 2012 at 9:24 am For those reassured by historical precedent, there is a diligently researched and documented book that presents evidence that the early church celebrated a same-sex nuptial liturgy. Thoroughly scholarly, it is even readable. “Same-Sex Unions in Premodern Europe” by John Boswell. See reviews athttp://www.amazon.com/Same-Sex-Unions-Premodern-Europe-Boswell/dp/0679751645/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1341753138&sr=1 Connie Williams says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL John Kirk says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Committee hears testimony on same-gender blessings liturgieslast_img read more

Saint Francis Community Services names new president and CEO

first_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Saint Francis Community Services names new president and CEO Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Hopkinsville, KY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Bath, NC Rector Belleville, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET center_img Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Tags Featured Events Rector Tampa, FL Rector Collierville, TN People Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Posted Jun 5, 2014 Rector Smithfield, NC [Saint Francis Community Services – Salina, Kansas] The Saint Francis Community Services Board of Directors has named The Rev. Robert Nelson Smith, currently of Peru, Illinois, as the child and family services provider’s sixth president and chief executive officer. Fr. Smith will assume his new duties on July 7.“Fr. Smith, an Episcopal priest, has an extensive background in healthcare administration and is excited to couple that experience with the work of Saint Francis Community Services,” said Board Chair The Rev. Dennis Gilhousen. “We believe he is exactly the right person to continue leading Saint Francis as we touch the lives of so many people.”Ordained to the priesthood in 2009, Fr. Smith earned his Master of Arts in Ministry, cum laude, from Nashotah House Theological Seminary in Nashotah, Wisconsin. For the last three years, he has served as associate rector to four churches that form the LaSalle County (Illinois) Episcopal Ministry within the Diocese of Chicago.Since 2009, Fr. Smith has also served as Vice President, Physician Services and Quality/COO for Illinois Valley Community Hospital (IVCH), overseeing department operational budgets of more than $125 million while developing strategies to improve patient care and safety and access to services. He also supervised operations for the IVCH Medical Group, which provides a range of healthcare services including primary care, specialized care, mental health services, and a community clinic to meet the needs of uninsured and underinsured patients.Prior to joining IVCH, Fr. Smith served as Director of Growth and Support Services for ThedaCare Physicians, and gained expertise in process improvement methods. ThedaCare is based in Appleton, Wisconsin.He has also served as Vice President of Physician Services for Community Health Network, a partnership of two critical access hospitals in north central Wisconsin, and as Director of Corporate Communications and Director of Professional Services for St. Mary’s Good Samaritan, Inc., a Catholic not-for-profit healthcare system in Illinois.Prior to his healthcare experience, Fr. Smith worked on Capitol Hill with a public policy focus on environmental, transportation, and infrastructure issues critical to rural communities.In all, Fr. Smith brings nearly 20 years of healthcare and public policy experience to Saint Francis Community Services.“I am humbled to have been asked to help guide the future of Saint Francis Community Services – the ministry that Fr. Mize began in 1945 and that Fr. Ed and the Board of Directors have carried forward is truly God’s work,” said Fr. Smith. “When I began my career in healthcare, my organization’s mission statement compelled us to continue the healing ministry of Jesus Christ, with special concern for the poor and vulnerable. This challenge has never left me and to know that Saint Francis Community Services is committed, at its most fundamental level, to providing the healing to children and families found in the forgiving, redeeming love of Christ is, for me, a ministry and calling to which I now dedicate my every effort.” Fr. Smith succeeds The Very Reverend Edward Fellhauer, who announced his retirement late last year after 12 years at the SFCS helm. About Saint Francis Community ServicesSaint Francis Community Services is an Episcopal donor-supported, faith-based, child and family, community-based service provider that has been a voice of hope for children and families since 1945. Our mission is to be an instrument of healing for children, youths, and families in spirit, mind, and body, so they live responsibly and productively with purpose and hope. For more information about Saint Francis, visit www.st-francis.org or call 1-800-423-1342. Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector Columbus, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Press Release Servicelast_img read more

Video: Jessie Fusco’s favorite part of Scripture

first_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Press Release Service Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS [Episcopal News Service – Villanova, Pennsylvania] Episcopal Youth Event 2014 participant Jessie Fusco from the Diocese of Minnesota tells why Psalm 23 is her favorite Bible verse.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Youth Event, Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit an Event Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Video, TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group center_img Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Tampa, FL Rector Bath, NC Rector Martinsville, VA EYE14, Youth & Young Adults Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Shreveport, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Smithfield, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jul 12, 2014 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Video: Jessie Fusco’s favorite part of Scripture Curate Diocese of Nebraska Tags Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Knoxville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, MElast_img read more