City Harvest: another life for London’s waste food

first_imgGallery: City Harvest LondonCity Harvest1 of 4City Harvest 1> Though the charity relies on help from volunteers (with the likes of Harvey Nichols routinely sending its staff to help sort surplus) it does pay its drivers to ensure it can meet demand from storesCity Harvest 3> Over Christmas 75% of food donated was fresh fruit & vegThe charity now works with nearly ever major supermarket, as well as corporate canteens, film studios and event venuesCity Harvest 2> Capacity has doubled in the past year with seven City Harvest vans now visiting stores and charities from its West London HQCity Harvest 5> Since 2014 it has collected 735 tonnes for redistribution1234 Though the charity relies on help from volunteers (with the likes of Harvey Nichols routinely sending its staff to help sort surplus) it does pay its drivers to ensure it can meet demand from stores Over Christmas 75% of food donated was fresh fruit & vegThe charity now works with nearly ever major supermarket, as well as corporate canteens, film studios and event venues Capacity has doubled in the past year with seven City Harvest vans now visiting stores and charities from its West London HQ Since 2014 it has collected 735 tonnes for redistribution City HarvestThough the charity relies on help from volunteers (with the likes of Harvey Nichols routinely sending its staff to help sort surplus) it does pay its drivers to ensure it can meet demand from storesoriginaldate 1/1/0001 6:00:00 AMheight 460width 620orientation 1camerasoftware Adobe Photoshop CC (Over Christmas 75% of food donated was fresh fruit & vegThe charity now works with nearly ever major supermarket, as well as corporate canteens, film studios and event venuesoriginaldate 1/1/0001 6:00:00 AMheight 460width 620orientation 1camerasoftware Adobe Photoshop CC (Capacity has doubled in the past year with seven City Harvest vans now visiting stores and charities from its West London HQoriginaldate 1/1/0001 6:00:00 AMheight 460width 620orientation 1camerasoftware Adobe Photoshop CC (Since 2014 it has collected 735 tonnes for redistributionoriginaldate 1/1/0001 6:00:00 AMheight 460width 620orientation 1camerasoftware Adobe Photoshop CC ( We want food to be eaten – not end up in the bin. Join our campaign and help us lobby government to take action on food waste: Pledge your support here City Harvest works the capital’s ‘last mile’, passing food from supermarkets and events to charities that need itWe’d get five times that from one of the large supermarkets.” Laura Winningham, CEO of charity City Harvest, is pointing to a trolley overflowing with artisan rolls, gourmet carrot cakes, pastries and fresh veg being wheeled toward us at the Whole Foods Market flagship store on Kensington High Street. Bags full of posh focaccia so heavy we can hardly lift them are passed to driver Jason as he packs crates into a van already loaded with chicken from Nando’s, snacks from Graze and sandwiches from a Tesco Express. We’re halfway through a daily run for the charity, which rescues wasted food from London stores and drops it off at nearby charities or non-profits, passing through Fulham, Hammersmith and Kensington via five grocers, three hostels and two soup kitchens. To date the team has redistributed 735 tonnes this way, enough to create 1.7 million meals for vulnerable people. In the past 12 months they’ve more than doubled capacity too, with seven vans now travelling across London each day and a new depot opening in April 2017 to store an increasing volume of surplus food. Winningham co-founded the charity with her husband and two friends four years ago, inspired by the US-based City Harvest she’d watched driving 18-wheelers in her native New York, picking up 50 tonnes-plus of surplus each day. “I figured London can’t be that different in its need for this type of thing,” she says. “So I just did it, knowing nothing about food, or vans or really anything. But it’s surprising what you can learn.” From “going around and popping their head in” a few local stores with one loaned van, City Harvest now works with almost every major supermarket chain in the city, as well as picking up leftovers from corporate canteens, events held at the likes of Olympia, film sets and defunct brands. Unlike FareShare, which has huge volumes of surplus delivered from distribution depots and manufacturers, City Harvest focuses on that “last mile” between the store and charity, working with FareShare to ensure surplus is picked up from many smaller stores signed up to Tesco’s Food Cloud system. And it’s put to good use. Every morsel collected by City Harvest’s drivers (all of whom are paid) is either handed direct to charities, stored in its new Acton depot or, in the tiny number of cases where it goes out of date, handed to a Shropshire farmer for pigfeed. “It really does help us,” says Michael Angus, manager for the Barons Court Project, a day centre for homeless and mentally ill people, as we hand over bread and vegetables for its Hammersmith kitchen. “I reckon we’ve saved on average £2k-3k per year through the donations we get. For us that’s a significant amount.”Ten minutes away, chef Andrew Calvocoressi is whipping up turkey hotpot, pork meatballs and egg drop soup – all made with the donated surplus food – at homeless charity The Upper Room. “I use everything,” he says. “I’ve been cooking for 40 years and I don’t think I’ve ever cooked so well because the produce is so good, and that’s half the battle.” But for Winningham there is still so much more surplus to access. “It’s funny. When we started we thought we’d have unlimited food and we wouldn’t have enough people to bring it to. Now we need more food.” As well as flicking through The Grocer each week to find new London startups with surplus to spare, Winningham believes building awareness even further among food companies will be crucial to securing more food. That means smoothing out the grass-roots process of picking up surplus. Too often staff turnover means relationships between drivers and store staff are lost (and with it a load of available surplus) while a lack of clear process mean drivers are sometimes presented with rubbish bags stuffed with unsorted surplus and rubbish. “Redistribution has to be part of the smooth operation of the store,” says Winningham. “Once it becomes the fabric of the business it’ll run as smoothly as the business. The CEO needs to set a process and evaluate cost, time and sustainability.” It’s all still a steep learning curve, she admits. “We’re four years in but that’s still a very young organisation.” One with plenty more scope to grow. “As long as there is demand we should grow until all those people have as much food as they need.” And with that, we’re on to our next drop-off.Sign our petitionlast_img read more

Tekmar Ready to Trade on London Stock Exchange with GBP 61.8 Million

first_imgUK-based provider of subsea technology and services to the offshore wind and oil & gas industries, Tekmar Group, will start trading on the AIM market of the London Stock Exchange on 20 June and plans to use the placing proceeds to acquire Tekmar Limited, repay debt within the Group and provide some GBP 10 million to fund future expansion and acquisitions.The company announced its intention to float on the London Stock Exchange on 4 June, and informed on 15 June that it had priced its initial public offer (IPO) with institutional investors to raise gross proceeds of approximately £61.8 million through a conditional placing of 47,536,789 shares at a price of GBP 1.30 per share.On admission on the AIM share market, Tekmar will have 50,000,000 shares in issue with an expected market capitalisation of approx. GBP 65 million.James Ritchie, Chief Executive Officer of Tekmar, said: “Being a quoted company will, we believe, allow us to execute our strategy, to become the partner of choice for the supply of subsea protection equipment to the global offshore energy markets, whilst retaining our independence with customers and suppliers.”“Importantly, our strengthened balance sheet post admission to trading on AIM will allow us to invest more readily in the Group’s expansion going forward. We also believe that admission to AIM will enhance our profile and brand recognition amongst potential clients and assist in the recruitment, retention and incentivisation of senior management and employees at all levels,” Ritchie said.Tekmar’s two primary markets are offshore wind, where it provides subsea protection for power transmission cables from and between offshore wind turbines, and oil & gas, to which it provides subsea protection for umbilicals and flexible pipes.last_img read more

JN/Visa Jackie Bell KO semis in spotlight

first_imgThe Jamaica National Visa-Kingston and St Andrew Football Association (KSAFA) Jackie Bell semi-finals are on today at the Constant Spring Complex.In the first game of the double-header, Cavalier will face Waterhouse, starting at 6:30 p.m., to be followed by Tivoli Gardens against Barbican at 8:30 p.m.Super League outfit Cavalier enter their semi-final on a high after a big 5-1 quarter-final victory against Central Kingston on Thursday night. However, they will not find Red Stripe Premier League team, Waterhouse, that easy.Cavalier are, however, playing some good football with players such as St George’s College schoolboy star Alex Marshall, captain Ryan Miller, Oshane Jenkins, Nicholas Hamilton and Kieron Brock leading the way.TOUGH GAMECoach Rudolph Speid is expecting a tough game.”This Waterhouse team has improved in the Premier League season. I know that they have quality players, but we remain confident in our passing game. It could go either way,” Speid told the Sunday Gleaner.On the other hand, the Glendon ‘Admiral’ Bailey-coached Waterhouse will rely on Kemar ‘Bushy’ Beckford, veteran Irvino English, Andre McFarland, goalkeeper Romaine Bowers and Nicholy Finlayson to take them to the final.Tivoli Gardens are expected to get the better of Barbican in the second game. However, Barbican are being guided by the wily former national assistant coach Miguel Coley, and they could surprise the Red Stripe Premier League outfit.Barbican’s key players include Locksley Thompson, Keno Simpson, Akino Bailey and Greg Taylor.Tivoli will be hoping that top striker and talisman, Jermaine ‘Teddy’ Johnson recovers from an injury sustained in the quarter-final against Harbour View last Wednesday night.Johnson apart, Tivoli will look to Jermaine Parris, captain Romaine Breakenridge, Elton Thompson, Tevin Shaw and Junior McGregor for success.last_img read more