K Sandwiches finally reopens after burning down in 2015

first_imgK Sandwiches finally reopens after burning down in 2015 Updated: 5:35 PM KUSI Newsroom KUSI Newsroom, Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwittercenter_img Posted: January 5, 2018 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsAfter burning down in a fire in August 2015, K Sandwiches has finally made its long awaited grand reopening. The Linda Vista sandwich shop opened in 2005 and was a local favorite. KUSI’s Allie Wagner was live at the grand re-opening Friday morning where San Diegans waited in line by the dozens to get their hands on the popular Vietnamese sandwiches and more. January 5, 2018last_img read more

Globular proteins found to allow squid eyes to adjust for light distortion

first_img More information: Eye patches: Protein assembly of index-gradient squid lenses, Science (2017). science.sciencemag.org/cgi/doi … 1126/science.aal2674AbstractA parabolic relationship between lens radius and refractive index allows spherical lenses to avoid spherical aberration. We show that in squid, patchy colloidal physics resulted from an evolutionary radiation of globular S-crystallin proteins. Small-angle x-ray scattering experiments on lens tissue show colloidal gels of S-crystallins at all radial positions. Sparse lens materials form via low-valence linkages between disordered loops protruding from the protein surface. The loops are polydisperse and bind via a set of hydrogen bonds between disordered side chains. Peripheral lens regions with low particle valence form stable, volume-spanning gels at low density, whereas central regions with higher average valence gel at higher densities. The proteins demonstrate an evolved set of linkers for self-assembly of nanoparticles into volumetric materials. Explore further Optic lobe of giant squid found proportionally smaller than for other cephalopods (Phys.org)—A team of researchers with the University of Pennsylvania has uncovered the means by which squid eyes are able to adjust to underwater light distortion. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their work analyzing squid eye parts under a microscope, what they found and then offer an explanation of the process involved in squid vision. Tobias Madl with Medical University of Graz in Austria offers an overview of how lenses work in general in a Perspective piece in the same journal issue, and outlines the work done in this new effort. Credit: CC0 Public Domain Prior work with squid had shown that their eyes are unique. The refractive index of each lens is greatest at its center and grows smaller toward the edges. This contrasts sharply with how glass lenses work—they have the same refractive index over their whole area—their shape focuses the light. The unique squid lens has clearly evolved to better handle the murky light available in the ocean, allowing the creatures to see much better than humans and many other sea creatures that have traditional lenses. In this new effort, the researchers sought to learn how the squid eye is able to pull off this feat.The study consisted of cutting squid eyes and studying them layer by layer under a microscope and applying small-angle X-ray scattering to learn more about the way light behaved as it encountered each layer and part of a lens. The researchers found that the lens was made mostly of a protein gel in the S-crystalline family. They attribute changes in the refractive index to the arrangement of the crystalline molecules. They found that in the center of the lens, the molecules were bound together in relatively large structures. The structures grew smaller relative to their distance from the center. At the edges of the lens, the structures were made from just two molecules. This works for the squid, because the structures allow for bending light differently depending on which part of the lens is struck. The result is far more clarity under dim light conditions.center_img Citation: Globular proteins found to allow squid eyes to adjust for light distortion (2017, August 11) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-08-globular-proteins-squid-eyes-adjust.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Journal information: Science © 2017 Phys.orglast_img read more

Scientists reach milestone in 3D laser writing in bulk silicon

first_img Citation: Scientists reach milestone in 3-D laser writing in bulk silicon (2017, October 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-10-scientists-milestone-d-laser-bulk.html Researchers fabricate 3-D silicon structures with a focused infrared laser More information: Margaux Chanal et al. “Crossing the threshold of ultrafast laser writing in bulk silicon.” Nature Communications. DOI: 10.1038/s41467-017-00907-8 Journal information: Nature Communications The researchers expect that the results will open the doors to 3D laser writing for silicon photonics applications, as well as for studying new physics in semiconductors.The scientists, Margaux Chanal et al., from institutes in France, Qatar, Russia, and Greece, have published their paper “Crossing the threshold of ultrafast laser writing in bulk silicon” in a recent issue of Nature Communications.In previous attempts at ultrafast laser writing in bulk silicon, scientists found that femtosecond lasers simply weren’t capable of structurally manipulating the bulk silicon, even when the laser energy was increased to the highest pulse intensity technologically possible. In the new study, the researchers found that, fortunately, there is no physical limit that prevents ultrafast laser-induced structural manipulations of bulk silicon. Instead, they found that the laser energy has to be delivered in the medium in an abrupt way in order to minimize losses from nonlinear absorption. This finding revealed that the problem of all past efforts arose from the laser’s small numerical aperture (NA), which refers to the range of angles over which focused laser light can be delivered. The researchers calculated that, in order to achieve the desired results, it would be necessary to obtain extreme NA values that have so far not been realized in this area.In order to reach these extreme NA values, the researchers borrowed a technique from advanced microscopy called solid-immersion microscopy. The idea is similar to the commonly used liquid-immersion microscopy, in which a small drop of oil is placed on the slide. As oil has a larger refractive index than air, the oil reduces the amount of optical refraction (bending of light) as the light travels between the slide and the microscope lens. This, in turn, increases the NA and the associated microscope’s resolution (the NA for a microscope measures the range of angles over which light is collected rather than delivered). The difference with solid-immersion microscopy is that a solid material with a high refractive index is used instead of a liquid. (Phys.org)—It has taken more than 20 years, but researchers have demonstrated for the first time that femtosecond lasers can be used to structurally manipulate bulk silicon for high-precision applications. Since the late ’90s, researchers have been using the ultrashort pulses of femtosecond lasers to write into bulk materials with wide band gaps, which are typically insulators. But until now, precise ultrafast laser writing has not been possible for materials with narrow band gaps, such as silicon and other semiconductors. © 2017 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. In the new study, the researchers used silicon spheres as the solid-immersion medium. They found that, when focusing the laser at the center of a sphere, they could completely suppress refraction and greatly increase the NA. The extreme NA values allowed the laser pulses to achieve sufficient ionization to break chemical bonds in the silicon, which in turn causes permanent structural changes in the material.”The in-depth understanding of the physics of the interaction and propagation of ultrashort laser pulses in low-band-gap semiconductors, like silicon, enabled us to solve this long-standing problem and achieve controlled material structural modifications, appropriate for applications,” coauthor Stelios Tzortzakis, at the Texas A&M University at Qatar, FORTH, and the University of Crete in Greece, told Phys.org. “Even more, the localized energy deposition in the medium results in out-of-equilibrium phases with extreme thermal and pressure gradients that can enable the creation and study of new states of matter, previously unreachable in laboratory environments.” In the future, the researchers plan to further push the boundaries of this approach by borrowing another microscopy technique called 4-Pi arrangement. This concept involves crossing multiple laser pulses with extreme NA values at the centers of spheres, which may lead to even greater possibilities in ultrafast laser writing in bulk silicon and other semiconductors.”3D laser writing applicable to silicon may drastically change how things are designed and fabricated in the important field of silicon photonics,” said coauthor David Grojo at CNRS/Aix-Marseille University in France. “Silicon photonics is seen as the next revolution of microelectronics using light at the chips level for ultimate speed data processing. However, it remains today a 2D world because of the planar lithographic methods used for fabrication (SOI technology). With our method we can envision the equivalent of a 3D printer for rapid prototyping of any innovative architecture. This will make possible for silicon photonics specialists to design things in 3D that must represent a real booster for the emergence of disruptive technologies and new concepts.” Experimental setup of using 60-femtosecond laser pulses for laser writing in silicon. Credit: Chanal et al. Published in Nature Communications Explore furtherlast_img read more

Review of Color Printers

first_imgDecember 1, 2005 4 min read This story appears in the December 2005 issue of Entrepreneur. Subscribe » Hewlett-Packard LaserJet 2840 (800) 463-7766 www.epson.com Pick the color printer that fits your business best, and paint the town red-or blue, or green, or purple . . . Laser multifunction 24 color and monochrome MANUFACTURER/ MODEL (800) 888-0262 www.hp.com $1,759 STREET PRICE Canon ImageClass MF8170c (800) OK-CANON www.usa.canon.com Solid Ink Enroll Now for Free 64MB RAM $1,000 17 color, and monochrome 25 color, and monochrome $999 $500 $800 128MB RAM, print, scan, copy, fax 5 color, 25 monochrome (800) 276-7746 www.brother.com Laser 128MB RAM, 85,000-page monthly duty cycle $899 64MB RAM, duplexing standard Brother HL-2700CN FEATURES TYPE PAGES PER MINUTE 8 color, 31 monochrome Laser multifunction 128MB RAM, 70,000-page monthly duty cycle (866) 596-2372 www.kyoceramita.com 4 color, 19 monochrome Lexmark C760n (800) LEXMARK www.lexmark.com 6 color, 25 monochrome Print, scan, copy, fax Laser Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now $899 4 color, 16 monochrome $399 Samsung CLP-510N Laser Epson AcuLaser CX11NF Laser all-in-one Kyocera Mita FS-C5020N (800) SAMSUNG www.samsungusa.com 96MB RAM, print, scan, copy, fax, 30,000-page monthly duty cycle (800) ASK-XEROX www.xerox.com It’s a colorful world, and sometimes your business documents need to reflect that. From brochures to invoices, color adds interest and gives you a professional edge. There are many routes you can take to add color to your printing options: inkjet, color laser, solid ink, personal printer or workgroup printer. For the most flexibility within your company, a networkable color printer is the ticket, and that usually translates to a color laser. We’re going to browse through a variety of colorful options, including a couple of multifunctions as well as a solid-ink offering from Xerox.The cost of running a printer is something to consider. The $1,759 (all prices street) Kyocera Mita FS-C5020N, for example, may not be an absolute speed demon, but it features a superefficient toner system that keeps your cost per page down. A toner-save feature like the Brother HL-2700CN offers is a smart way to extend the life of your consumables. The Lexmark C760n lets you designate which users are allowed to print in color–an easy way to conserve your color toner.Memory is important for users who throw large files at their color printers. A good chunk of built-in memory will keep the printer from getting brain freeze when you toss a graphics-heavy brochure at it. Most printers over $1,000, like the Lexmark C760n, come with 128MB RAM that can be upgraded if necessary. The C760n, for instance, maxes out at 512MB.At the lower end of the cost spectrum is the Brother HL-2700CN. It skims in at $500 with print speeds of up to 8 pages per minute in color and 31 ppm in monochrome. That’s pretty affordable for a network-ready color laser printer. For about $400, the Samsung CLP-510N gives you slightly slower speeds of up to 6 ppm in color and 25 ppm in monochrome; its built-in automatic duplexing is a nice extra.Printer speed involves more than just pages per minute–there’s also the time it takes to get the first page out. That’s where the $899 Xerox Phaser 8500/N flexes its solid-ink muscle. It can get the first color page out in less than 6 seconds, compared to 19 seconds for the Brother HL-2700CN. Solid ink technology also tends to produce very vivid colors and fast speeds overall.When your needs go beyond printing, a multifunction could be right up your alley. The $800 Epson AcuLaser CX11NF covers faxing, scanning and copying as well as printing. One trade-off for all that functionality is speed. Color speeds top out at 5 ppm. Compare to the $999 Hewlett-Packard LaserJet 2840, which comes in at 4 ppm in color and also comes stocked with direct digital photo printing. The Canon ImageClass MF8170c multifunction features high-quality flatbed scanning for $899.Lasers still can’t quite beat specialty inkjets when it comes to photo printing, but their speed and the cost of consumables make them a good choice for companies that focus on brochures and business documents. Throw in networking capability, and you get a versatile solution that will handle the needs of your small office or workgroup–and make your business more colorful. Xerox Phaser 8500/N 128MB RAM, 85,000-page monthly duty cycle Shopping List This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. Laser CONTACTlast_img read more