Klopp slams Ramos’s ruthless and brutal show in Champions League final

first_imgLiverpool manager Juergen Klopp tore into Real Madrid captain Sergio Ramos’ display in the Champions League final in May.Ramos’ challenge on Mohamed Salah forced the Egyptian to go off early in the first half and also miss the first World Cup game in Russia. Klopp said that Ramos was ‘ruthless and brutal’ in that game and had wrestled Salah to the ground.”We are opening that bottle again? It is action-reaction-action-reaction and I don’t like that but — if you watch it back and you are not with Real Madrid — then you think it is ruthless and brutal. I saw the ref taking charge of big games at the World Cup and nobody really thinks about that later. But in a situation like that somebody needs to judge it better,” Klopp said in a news conference ahead of Liverpool’s International Champions Cup game against Manchester United at the Michigan Stadium in Ann Arbor.”If VAR is coming then it is a situation where you have to look again. Not to give a red card but to look again and say: ‘What is that?’ It was ruthless.”Also read – Salah hits out at Ramos over Champions League final injurySalah had a remarkable first season with Liverpool, scoring 44 goals across all competitions and helped Liverpool reach the Champions League final after a decade. But, the challenge cut down his time on the pitch as he left the pitch in tears in Kiev.Salah’s going off was a major blow for Liverpool as their goalkeeper Loris Karius, who it later emerged had suffered a concussion during the match, made couple of blunders to concede two goals against Madrid who won 3-1.advertisementKarius clashed with Ramos early in the second half and was seen holding the side of his head after the collision, which came before he made the mistakes that led to the goals.Also read – He grabbed my arm first, says Ramos after being blamed for Salah’s injuryRamos later brushed off allegations that he had deliberately injured Salah, saying he was being unfairly painted as a pantomime villain.”I’m not sure it is an experience we will have again — go there and put an elbow to the goalkeeper, put their goalscorer down like a wrestler in midfield and then you win the game. That was the story of the game,” Klopp said.”Ramos said a lot of things afterwards that I didn’t like. As a person I didn’t like the reactions of him. He was like: ‘Whatever, what do they want? It’s normal’.”No, it is not normal. If you put all of the situations of Ramos together then you will see a lot of situations with Ramos…It is like we, the world out there, accepts that you use each weapon to win the game. People probably expect that I am the same. I am not.”(With inputs from Reuters)last_img read more

Media Urged to Report Government Statistics Responsibly

first_img Finance and the Public Service Minister, Dr. the Hon. Nigel Clarke, says media practitioners, particularly those involved in delivering news and current affairs content, have a key role to play in how official government statistics are communicated to the public. Story Highlights He acknowledged that in an increasingly “fluid and fast-paced” news culture, there is pressure on and competition among media houses to creatively report on current developments, which could lead to miscommunication, particularly on economic data. “At some point, we are going to have to transition to [such] an environment [and] I think competition is going to take us there, because news media will emerge [that] actually take these things seriously and have serious dialogue around [them],” he added. Finance and the Public Service Minister, Dr. the Hon. Nigel Clarke, says media practitioners, particularly those involved in delivering news and current affairs content, have a key role to play in how official government statistics are communicated to the public.Speaking at a recent Statistical Institute of Jamaica (STATIN) media sensitisation seminar at the Terra Nova All-Suite Hotel in St. Andrew, Dr. Clarke said that as the Administration pursues Jamaica’s development as a market economy, data and official statistics will become increasingly pivotal to the planning process.“Those who are best able to interpret and best use them will have an advantage… and media practitioners… have a crucial role to play in, first of all, understanding these  official statistics, and communicating them to the public,” the Minister said.He acknowledged that in an increasingly “fluid and fast-paced” news culture, there is pressure on and competition among media houses to creatively report on current developments, which could lead to miscommunication, particularly on economic data.“The adjectives and adverbs… that we use around issues such as inflation [at times] become misplaced. So verbs like ‘jumped’ and ‘plunged’… those kinds of sensational words that we use, sometimes, do not add to the public good,” he contended.The Minister suggested that official data should, ideally, “just be reported in a neutral way”.“If you look at the international financial news channels… when [journalists] are discussing matters like inflation, the gross domestic product and unemployment [they are] having a rational discussion around the numbers,” he pointed out.“At some point, we are going to have to transition to [such] an environment [and] I think competition is going to take us there, because news media will emerge [that] actually take these things seriously and have serious dialogue around [them],” he added.The seminar, which was held under the theme ‘Statistics and the Media – Why Understanding Official Data Matters’, was aimed at assisting media practitioners to understand, interpret and present official data accurately.It focused on the gross domestic product (GDP) and consumer price index.last_img read more