Surveillance cameras help police reduce crime in Guatemala City

first_imgBy Dialogo October 20, 2014 Presently, the cameras have been installed in various strategic points throughout the city, with a special emphasis on Zone 18, which had a rate of 72 homicides per 100,000 residents in early 2012. By comparison, the entire country has a homicide rate of nearly 40 per 100,000 residents, according to a report presented in April by the United Nations. They were right. The initiative stays in constant contact with security authorities to share information such as data on suspicious license plates, criminal profiles, and patterns of behavior in certain areas. The surveillance cameras are not only helping police respond quickly to criminal activity, they are helping law enforcement authorities gather data that will allow them to develop long-term approaches to fighting crime. Police agents monitor the videos from their stations and alert officers on patrol to possible criminal activity in real time. The cameras have helped them respond to crimes quickly enough to capture suspects before they could escape. “Police forces have more ‘eyes’ for surveillance, which prevents criminals from committing crimes,” said Carlos Argueta, Deputy Minister of Technology of the Ministry of the Interior (Mingob). “It’s such a novelty that agents patrolling the streets have support from the center. This has allowed them to make some captures red-handed.” The cameras have different capabilities. The majority of them – about 80 percent – are stationary and aimed at a fixed location. Police can move about 20 percent of them to the right and left and up and down. And 10 percent of them have facial recognition capability – meaning that they can identify criminals by their faces through their connection to a database maintained by the National Register of Persons (Renap). Police can also compare footage of license plates to the Tax Administration Authority (SAT)’s database to see if vehicles under surveillance have been reported stolen or are subject to seizure. They were right. Training courses in forensic analysis will be incorporated into the National Civil Police (PNC) Training Academy. The PNC is mandated with gathering intelligence to fight criminal organizations and fight crime. “Having advanced search systems facilitates criminal and judicial investigations. Our model, called SafeCity, focuses on achieving a smarter public safety infrastructure through tight integration over the Internet,” said Pedro Cruz, project coordinator for alertos.org. “Video surveillance can be a useful tool for creating intelligence strategies,” said Francisco Guezada, a security analyst at the National Economic Research Center (CIEN). “According to the information collected from surveillance, [security agents] should be able to detect the patterns, routes, and modus operandi of criminals.” “Having advanced search systems facilitates criminal and judicial investigations. Our model, called SafeCity, focuses on achieving a smarter public safety infrastructure through tight integration over the Internet,” said Pedro Cruz, project coordinator for alertos.org. “We currently have three forensic analysis technicians and they will be responsible for training 30 more,” Argueta said. “This way we will improve our criminal investigation processes.” Guatemala has a successful history of using technology to fight crime and improve public safety. “We currently have three forensic analysis technicians and they will be responsible for training 30 more,” Argueta said. “This way we will improve our criminal investigation processes.” Training courses in forensic analysis will be incorporated into the National Civil Police (PNC) Training Academy. The PNC is mandated with gathering intelligence to fight criminal organizations and fight crime. Using technology to fight crime Violence rates in sectors under surveillance have dropped by up to 40 percent since law enforcement authorities installed the video cameras at a cost of $150 million (USD). For example, in 2011, the Safe Cities Association launched the website alertos.org, which integrates surveillance services in high-crime areas and displays detailed information in real time. The creation of this platform seeks to achieve inter-institutional cooperation and increased strategic intelligence in the use and exchange of data. It receives feeds from various information sources, including civil complaints, and creates a statistical database of criminal incidents. In September, the website recorded 46 armed attacks and 84 homicides throughout the country. Guatemala has a successful history of using technology to fight crime and improve public safety. Guatemalan police officials believed the 1,900 surveillance cameras authorities installed in June in different parts of Guatemala City would help them prevent crime and fight violence. “Video surveillance can be a useful tool for creating intelligence strategies,” said Francisco Guezada, a security analyst at the National Economic Research Center (CIEN). “According to the information collected from surveillance, [security agents] should be able to detect the patterns, routes, and modus operandi of criminals.” Presently, the cameras have been installed in various strategic points throughout the city, with a special emphasis on Zone 18, which had a rate of 72 homicides per 100,000 residents in early 2012. By comparison, the entire country has a homicide rate of nearly 40 per 100,000 residents, according to a report presented in April by the United Nations. Police agents monitor the videos from their stations and alert officers on patrol to possible criminal activity in real time. The cameras have helped them respond to crimes quickly enough to capture suspects before they could escape. “Police forces have more ‘eyes’ for surveillance, which prevents criminals from committing crimes,” said Carlos Argueta, Deputy Minister of Technology of the Ministry of the Interior (Mingob). “It’s such a novelty that agents patrolling the streets have support from the center. This has allowed them to make some captures red-handed.” The cameras have different capabilities. The majority of them – about 80 percent – are stationary and aimed at a fixed location. Police can move about 20 percent of them to the right and left and up and down. And 10 percent of them have facial recognition capability – meaning that they can identify criminals by their faces through their connection to a database maintained by the National Register of Persons (Renap). Police can also compare footage of license plates to the Tax Administration Authority (SAT)’s database to see if vehicles under surveillance have been reported stolen or are subject to seizure. Police authorities plan on installing an additional 2,100 surveillance cameras throughout Guatemala City by the end of 2014. Many of the cameras will be placed in neighborhoods at-risk for violent crime, such as Mixco and Amatitlán in the Central District, as well as Escuintla and Sacatepéquez. Using technology to fight crime The surveillance cameras are not only helping police respond quickly to criminal activity, they are helping law enforcement authorities gather data that will allow them to develop long-term approaches to fighting crime. Violence rates in sectors under surveillance have dropped by up to 40 percent since law enforcement authorities installed the video cameras at a cost of $150 million (USD). Surveillance cameras help police develop anti-crime strategies: Analyst Guatemalan police officials believed the 1,900 surveillance cameras authorities installed in June in different parts of Guatemala City would help them prevent crime and fight violence. Surveillance cameras help police develop anti-crime strategies: Analyst For example, in 2011, the Safe Cities Association launched the website alertos.org, which integrates surveillance services in high-crime areas and displays detailed information in real time. The creation of this platform seeks to achieve inter-institutional cooperation and increased strategic intelligence in the use and exchange of data. It receives feeds from various information sources, including civil complaints, and creates a statistical database of criminal incidents. In September, the website recorded 46 armed attacks and 84 homicides throughout the country. Police authorities plan on installing an additional 2,100 surveillance cameras throughout Guatemala City by the end of 2014. Many of the cameras will be placed in neighborhoods at-risk for violent crime, such as Mixco and Amatitlán in the Central District, as well as Escuintla and Sacatepéquez. The initiative stays in constant contact with security authorities to share information such as data on suspicious license plates, criminal profiles, and patterns of behavior in certain areas. This strengthens the Strategy for Citizen Security, which is focused on fighting crime and preventing crime. To complement this strategy, more institutional presence is needed.last_img read more

IMCA Speedway Motors Weekly Racing National Point Standings Through March 6

first_imgMach-1 Sport Compacts – 1. Brian Schoenbaum, Killeen, Texas, 223; 2. Steven Bevills, Gran­bury, Texas, 206; 3. William Creese, Springtown, Texas, 197; 4. Clifton Whisenant, Proctor, Texas, 184; 5. Harold Clifton, Stephenville, Texas, 180; 6. Howard Watson, Weatherford, Texas, 171; 7. Pamela Whisenant, Proctor, Texas, 165; 8. Kaleb Watson, Mineral Wells, Texas, 151; 9. Ryan Whisenant, Stephenville, Texas, 132; 10. Anthony Vandenberg, Dublin, Texas, 129; 11. Scott Newbury, Rhome, Texas, 108; 12. Randy McNorton Jr., Alvord, Texas, 94; 13. Kody Crofutt, Dublin, Texas, 87; 14. Colton Mooney, Boyd, Texas, 61; 15. Derek Cates, Woodway, Texas, 37; 16. Dan Webre, West, Texas, 36; 17. Robert Cody, Farmington, N.M., and Dakota Dees, Weatherford, Texas, both 34; 19. Jackie Parmeley, Phoenix, Ariz., 33; 20. Zachary Martin, Waco, Texas, 32. Karl Chevrolet Northern SportMods – 1. Chase Rudolf, Prole, Iowa, 332; 2. Mark Harrison, Coolidge, Ariz., 267; 3. Cole Carver, Apache Junction, Ariz., 265; 4. Jake McBirnie, Boone, Iowa, and Brady Bjella, Williston, N.D., both 257; 6. Kelly Jacobson, Fargo, N.D., 242; 7. Ethan Braaksma, Newton, Iowa, 224; 8. Keith Brown Jr., Pittsburg, Calif., 223; 9. Ryan Moser, Eng­lewood, Colo., 219; 10. David Jones, Chandler, Ariz., 211; 11. Michael Egurola Jr., Tucson, Ariz., 209; 12. Justin Svoboda, David City, Neb., 194; 13. Mark Madrid, Laveen, Ariz., 182; 14. Tate Johnson, Homestead, Mont., 175; 15. Dwayne Melvin, Medford, Ore., 171; 16. Brian Osantowski, Co­lumbus, Neb., 163; 17. Kevin Johnson, Bakersfield, Calif., 160; 18. Ty Weidner, Chandler, Ariz., 157; 19. Bo Partain, Casa Grande, Ariz., 156; 20. Brandyn Johnson, Mesa, Ariz., 153.  IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stocks – 1. Nathan DeRagon, Peoria, Ariz., 139; 2. Adam Goff, Minot, N.D., 116; 3. Bradley Stafford, Glendale, Ariz., 105; 4. Kyle Cardinal, Paradise Valley, Ariz., 100; 5. Max Zachrison, Surprise, Ariz., 68; 6. Scott Tenney, Yuma, Ariz., 36. IMCA Modifieds – 1. Ricky Thornton Jr., Adel, Iowa, 395; 2. Hunter Marriott, Brookfield, Mo., 345; 3. Kollin Hibdon, Pahrump, Nev., 286; 4. Zachary Madrid, Tucson, Ariz., 261; 5. Drew Arm­strong, Alexander, Ark., 231; 6. Jacob O’Neil, Tucson, Ariz., 223; 7. Jeff Taylor, Cave City, Ark., 215; 8. Don Gumke, Jamestown, N.D., 214; 9. D.J. Shannon, Merced, Calif., 213; 10. Casey Arneson, Fargo, N.D., 203; 11. Kelsie Foley, Tucson, Ariz., 201; 12. Tim Ward, Chandler, Ariz., 196; 13. Tyler Mecl, Queen Creek, Ariz., and Jason Noll, Peoria, Ariz., both 193; 15. Jeff Larson, Freeport, Ill., 190; 16. Justin Kay, Wheatland, Iowa, 187; 17. Clint Reichenbach, Santa Maria, Calif., 176; 18. Garth Dushanek, Red Deer, Alb., 172; 19. Joey Price, Great Falls, Mont., 166; 20. Ryan Roath, Peoria, Ariz., 165. IMCA Sunoco Stock Cars – 1. Jeffrey Abbey, Comanche, Texas, 313; 2. Westin Abbey, Coman­che, Texas, 240; 3. George Fronsman, Surprise, Ariz., 225; 4. Cody Center, Mesa, Ariz., 215; 5. Curt Lund, Redwood Falls, Minn., 210; 6. Dean Abbey, Roanoke, Texas, 202; 7. Dean Cornelius, New Prague, Minn., 199; 8. Elijah Zevenbergen, Ocheyedan, Iowa, 183; 9. Shelby Williams, Bon­ham, Texas, 180; 10. Jason Rogers, Selden, Kan., 179; 11. Jason Batt, Harker Heights, Texas, 178; 12. J.C. Parmeley, Peoria, Ariz., 174; 13. Lonnie Foss, Glendale, Ariz., 171; 14. Dennis Bis­sonnette, Stephenville, Texas, 165; 15. Kirk Martin, Weatherford, Texas, and Joe Bellm, Broom­field, Colo., both 162; 17. G.W. IV Egbert, Belton, Texas, 151; 18. Tyler Muirhead, Mabank, Texas, 148; 19. Jason Josselyn, Alamogordo, N.M., 145; 20. Michael Sheen, Lamesa, Texas, 144.  IMCA RaceSaver Sprint Cars – 1. Jacob Harris, Vidor, Texas, and Kyle Rasmussen, Clovis, Calif., both 40; 3. Tyler Harris, Vidor, Texas, and Mike Schott, Tulare, Calif., both 39; 5. Rod Craddock, Alvin, Texas, and Brooklyn Holland, Fresno, Calif., both 38; 7. Dustyn Welch, Bryan, Texas, 37; 8. Marcus Thomas, Corsicana, Texas, and Brendan Warmerdam, Lemoore, Calif., both 36; 10. Kent Lewis Sr., Willis, Texas, and Connor Danell, Visalia, Calif., both 35; 12. Daniel King, Conroe, Texas, and Ryan Delisle, Fresno, Calif., both 34; 14. Robert Vetter, Wolfe City, Texas, 33; 15. Caleb Padgett, Madisonville, Texas, and Lance Jackson, Kingsburg, Calif., both 32; 17. Mike Oliver, San Antonio, Texas, 31; 18. Blake Cunningham, Silsbee, Texas, 30; 19. Danny Burke, Crosby, Texas, 29; 20. Mauro Simone, Fresno, Calif., 28. Smiley’s Racing Products Southern SportMods – 1. Taylor Florio, Copperas Cove, Texas, 235; 2. James Hanusch, Belton, Texas, 218; 3. Gregory Muirhead, Mabank, Texas, 208; 4. Justin Nabors, Kemp, Texas, 201; 5. James McCreery, Midlothian, Texas, 176; 6. Jay Coone, Weatherford, Texas, 137; 7. Kaden Hon­eycutt, Willow Park, Texas, 131; 8. Larry Underwood, Temple, Texas, 123; 9. Chris Florio, Cop­peras Cove, Texas, 115; 10. Justin Shaw, Sweetwater, Texas, 108; 11. David Bolf, Wichita Falls, Texas, 107; 12. Garett Rawls, Elm Mott, Texas, and Colton Monroe, Copperas Cove, Texas, both 101; 14. Damon Hammond, Burleson, Texas, 100; 15. Ryan Thomas, Lubbock, Texas, and Wes Cummings, Arlington, Texas, both 83; 17. Edward Grmela Jr., Hewitt, Texas, and Evan Moore, Springtown, Texas, both 82; 19. Gabe Tucker, Carbon, Texas, 80; 20. Robby Crabtree, Clyde, Texas, 73.last_img read more