Surveillance cameras help police reduce crime in Guatemala City

first_imgBy Dialogo October 20, 2014 Presently, the cameras have been installed in various strategic points throughout the city, with a special emphasis on Zone 18, which had a rate of 72 homicides per 100,000 residents in early 2012. By comparison, the entire country has a homicide rate of nearly 40 per 100,000 residents, according to a report presented in April by the United Nations. They were right. The initiative stays in constant contact with security authorities to share information such as data on suspicious license plates, criminal profiles, and patterns of behavior in certain areas. The surveillance cameras are not only helping police respond quickly to criminal activity, they are helping law enforcement authorities gather data that will allow them to develop long-term approaches to fighting crime. Police agents monitor the videos from their stations and alert officers on patrol to possible criminal activity in real time. The cameras have helped them respond to crimes quickly enough to capture suspects before they could escape. “Police forces have more ‘eyes’ for surveillance, which prevents criminals from committing crimes,” said Carlos Argueta, Deputy Minister of Technology of the Ministry of the Interior (Mingob). “It’s such a novelty that agents patrolling the streets have support from the center. This has allowed them to make some captures red-handed.” The cameras have different capabilities. The majority of them – about 80 percent – are stationary and aimed at a fixed location. Police can move about 20 percent of them to the right and left and up and down. And 10 percent of them have facial recognition capability – meaning that they can identify criminals by their faces through their connection to a database maintained by the National Register of Persons (Renap). Police can also compare footage of license plates to the Tax Administration Authority (SAT)’s database to see if vehicles under surveillance have been reported stolen or are subject to seizure. They were right. Training courses in forensic analysis will be incorporated into the National Civil Police (PNC) Training Academy. The PNC is mandated with gathering intelligence to fight criminal organizations and fight crime. “Having advanced search systems facilitates criminal and judicial investigations. Our model, called SafeCity, focuses on achieving a smarter public safety infrastructure through tight integration over the Internet,” said Pedro Cruz, project coordinator for alertos.org. “Video surveillance can be a useful tool for creating intelligence strategies,” said Francisco Guezada, a security analyst at the National Economic Research Center (CIEN). “According to the information collected from surveillance, [security agents] should be able to detect the patterns, routes, and modus operandi of criminals.” “Having advanced search systems facilitates criminal and judicial investigations. Our model, called SafeCity, focuses on achieving a smarter public safety infrastructure through tight integration over the Internet,” said Pedro Cruz, project coordinator for alertos.org. “We currently have three forensic analysis technicians and they will be responsible for training 30 more,” Argueta said. “This way we will improve our criminal investigation processes.” Guatemala has a successful history of using technology to fight crime and improve public safety. “We currently have three forensic analysis technicians and they will be responsible for training 30 more,” Argueta said. “This way we will improve our criminal investigation processes.” Training courses in forensic analysis will be incorporated into the National Civil Police (PNC) Training Academy. The PNC is mandated with gathering intelligence to fight criminal organizations and fight crime. Using technology to fight crime Violence rates in sectors under surveillance have dropped by up to 40 percent since law enforcement authorities installed the video cameras at a cost of $150 million (USD). For example, in 2011, the Safe Cities Association launched the website alertos.org, which integrates surveillance services in high-crime areas and displays detailed information in real time. The creation of this platform seeks to achieve inter-institutional cooperation and increased strategic intelligence in the use and exchange of data. It receives feeds from various information sources, including civil complaints, and creates a statistical database of criminal incidents. In September, the website recorded 46 armed attacks and 84 homicides throughout the country. Guatemala has a successful history of using technology to fight crime and improve public safety. Guatemalan police officials believed the 1,900 surveillance cameras authorities installed in June in different parts of Guatemala City would help them prevent crime and fight violence. “Video surveillance can be a useful tool for creating intelligence strategies,” said Francisco Guezada, a security analyst at the National Economic Research Center (CIEN). “According to the information collected from surveillance, [security agents] should be able to detect the patterns, routes, and modus operandi of criminals.” Presently, the cameras have been installed in various strategic points throughout the city, with a special emphasis on Zone 18, which had a rate of 72 homicides per 100,000 residents in early 2012. By comparison, the entire country has a homicide rate of nearly 40 per 100,000 residents, according to a report presented in April by the United Nations. Police agents monitor the videos from their stations and alert officers on patrol to possible criminal activity in real time. The cameras have helped them respond to crimes quickly enough to capture suspects before they could escape. “Police forces have more ‘eyes’ for surveillance, which prevents criminals from committing crimes,” said Carlos Argueta, Deputy Minister of Technology of the Ministry of the Interior (Mingob). “It’s such a novelty that agents patrolling the streets have support from the center. This has allowed them to make some captures red-handed.” The cameras have different capabilities. The majority of them – about 80 percent – are stationary and aimed at a fixed location. Police can move about 20 percent of them to the right and left and up and down. And 10 percent of them have facial recognition capability – meaning that they can identify criminals by their faces through their connection to a database maintained by the National Register of Persons (Renap). Police can also compare footage of license plates to the Tax Administration Authority (SAT)’s database to see if vehicles under surveillance have been reported stolen or are subject to seizure. Police authorities plan on installing an additional 2,100 surveillance cameras throughout Guatemala City by the end of 2014. Many of the cameras will be placed in neighborhoods at-risk for violent crime, such as Mixco and Amatitlán in the Central District, as well as Escuintla and Sacatepéquez. Using technology to fight crime The surveillance cameras are not only helping police respond quickly to criminal activity, they are helping law enforcement authorities gather data that will allow them to develop long-term approaches to fighting crime. Violence rates in sectors under surveillance have dropped by up to 40 percent since law enforcement authorities installed the video cameras at a cost of $150 million (USD). Surveillance cameras help police develop anti-crime strategies: Analyst Guatemalan police officials believed the 1,900 surveillance cameras authorities installed in June in different parts of Guatemala City would help them prevent crime and fight violence. Surveillance cameras help police develop anti-crime strategies: Analyst For example, in 2011, the Safe Cities Association launched the website alertos.org, which integrates surveillance services in high-crime areas and displays detailed information in real time. The creation of this platform seeks to achieve inter-institutional cooperation and increased strategic intelligence in the use and exchange of data. It receives feeds from various information sources, including civil complaints, and creates a statistical database of criminal incidents. In September, the website recorded 46 armed attacks and 84 homicides throughout the country. Police authorities plan on installing an additional 2,100 surveillance cameras throughout Guatemala City by the end of 2014. Many of the cameras will be placed in neighborhoods at-risk for violent crime, such as Mixco and Amatitlán in the Central District, as well as Escuintla and Sacatepéquez. The initiative stays in constant contact with security authorities to share information such as data on suspicious license plates, criminal profiles, and patterns of behavior in certain areas. This strengthens the Strategy for Citizen Security, which is focused on fighting crime and preventing crime. To complement this strategy, more institutional presence is needed.last_img read more

COVID-19: Jakarta medical workers still waiting for promised financial incentives

first_imgMedical workers treating COVID-19 patients in Jakarta have yet to receive the financial incentives promised by the government since March, after the country recorded its first confirmed cases.The director of Koja Regional General Hospital (RSUD) in North Jakarta, Banjar, said he had submitted the required documents for staff to receive the incentive, including copies of medical workers’ employee cards and accountability reports.”But our staff have still not received any payments,” Banjar said on Wednesday. It has been the same for medical staff at RSUD Pasar Minggu in South Jakarta. The hospital’s director, Yudi, confirmed the promised-incentives had yet to be disbursed.”Please ask the Jakarta Health Agency for further information regarding the delay,” Yudi said as quoted by kompas.com.Read also: Government pledges to cut red tape to accelerate healthcare spendingThe central government has reportedly set aside Rp 5.9 trillion (US$396 million) for incentives for front-line healthcare workers across the country. Medical specialists will receive Rp 15 million per month, physicians and dentists Rp 10 million, while nurses and other medical staff members will get Rp 7.5 million and Rp 5 million, respectively. A total of Rp 300 million in compensation will also be provided in case of death.Health Minister Terawan Agus Putranto stated previously that the money would be disbursed starting from May yet progress has moved at a snail’s pace, drawing a rebuke from President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo. In a video released by the President’s press office in June, Jokowi delivered an uncharacteristically angry speech during a Cabinet meeting about the sluggish implementation of several policies, including the provision of financial incentives to health workers. Read also: Administrative issues hamper COVID-19 budget disbursement: Sri MulyaniJakarta Financial Management Body (BKPD) head Edy Sumantri said the administration was supposed to have received around Rp 92.9 billion to be channeled to the city’s medical workers. “However, we have only received Rp 56.2 billion so far, which has caused the delay,” Edy said, adding that he would seek the immediate disbursement of the remaining funds.In the meantime, the BKPD will process the funds it has received and disburse it to health workers. “We will start to pay the incentives next Monday,” Edy told kompas.com on Thursday. (vny)Topics :last_img read more

Authorities search for man who attempted to kidnap at 12-year-old girl

first_imgOfficials are currently asking for the public’s help in identifying a suspect who reportedly attempted to kidnap a 12-year-old girl while she was walking on a street in Miami.The incident occurred on April 12th while the child was walking along Northwest 57th Street.According to the report, the man noticed the young girl as he was crossing the street and stopped to ask her a few questions. The girl told authorities that she ignored his questions and kept walking and that’s when the man grabbed her by the hair and by the waist and tried to pull her toward him. The girl, however, was able to break away and run to safety.Authorities are now asking for the public’s help in identifying the suspect.If you recognize the person in this sketch, you are asked to call police at (305) 603-6370 or Miami-Dade Crime Stoppers at (305) 471-TIPS.last_img read more