Serve up healthier teatime treats with pre-mixes

first_imgDawn Foods (Evesham, Worcs) has developed a cake mix that is free of hydrogenated and trans fats. “This mix is great because it produces an old-fashioned traditional teatime cake, while offering bakers the choice of producing a whole range of other tasty treats,” says Dawn Foods’ marketing director Maggie Dagostino.Another addition to the company’s range is a low-fat and low-sodium concentrate to meet the needs of an increasingly health-conscious consumer, says the firm. Developed to make 97% fat-free products and with a sodium content of less than 300mg per 100g serving, the concentrate enables bakers to produce a range of muffins to appeal, in particular, to female customers. Adding flour, sugar and water produces a soft, moist, textured product, with none of the rubbery mouthfeel often associated with low-fat goods, says the company. However, other inclusions need to be fat free so as not to compromise the total fat content of the finished product.A new improved Madeira cake pre-mix is another new offering from Dawn Foods. The Bakers Select cake mix produces a cake with a buttery flavour and moist close crumb structure, says the company. It adds that the mix produces consistently even product with little waste from each batch.“It has also been developed to produce an increased volume, ensuring that the baker can scale a lower weight to achieve the same sized baked product,” says Dawn.The Madeira mix can be used for loaf cakes, slab cakes, fairy cakes and fondant fancies, as well as Madeira cakes. The mix can incorporate fruit and other inclusions.last_img read more

Bolivia: Organized Crime on the Border

first_img Eight in 10 narcotics investigations begin with reports from citizen informants. Source: José Luis Bravo, Santa Cruz, Bolivia anti-drug prosecutor, http://eju.tv Today it is imperative to intensify information about the Southern Cone, terrorism and drug trafficking are subtly setting up with the approval of governments deep into defunct socialism, called 20th Century, which will affect the region in time. Futhermore, with the recent elections in Argentina, an armed conflict could be unleashed in the northern part of the country, leading to the intensification of illegal activities. Latin America deserves more attention, above all to proceed tightly in countries vulnerable to human rights violations. Keep your information coming and congratulations to the “Diálogo” magazine. By Dialogo October 01, 2012last_img read more

Surveillance cameras help police reduce crime in Guatemala City

first_imgBy Dialogo October 20, 2014 Presently, the cameras have been installed in various strategic points throughout the city, with a special emphasis on Zone 18, which had a rate of 72 homicides per 100,000 residents in early 2012. By comparison, the entire country has a homicide rate of nearly 40 per 100,000 residents, according to a report presented in April by the United Nations. They were right. The initiative stays in constant contact with security authorities to share information such as data on suspicious license plates, criminal profiles, and patterns of behavior in certain areas. The surveillance cameras are not only helping police respond quickly to criminal activity, they are helping law enforcement authorities gather data that will allow them to develop long-term approaches to fighting crime. Police agents monitor the videos from their stations and alert officers on patrol to possible criminal activity in real time. The cameras have helped them respond to crimes quickly enough to capture suspects before they could escape. “Police forces have more ‘eyes’ for surveillance, which prevents criminals from committing crimes,” said Carlos Argueta, Deputy Minister of Technology of the Ministry of the Interior (Mingob). “It’s such a novelty that agents patrolling the streets have support from the center. This has allowed them to make some captures red-handed.” The cameras have different capabilities. The majority of them – about 80 percent – are stationary and aimed at a fixed location. Police can move about 20 percent of them to the right and left and up and down. And 10 percent of them have facial recognition capability – meaning that they can identify criminals by their faces through their connection to a database maintained by the National Register of Persons (Renap). Police can also compare footage of license plates to the Tax Administration Authority (SAT)’s database to see if vehicles under surveillance have been reported stolen or are subject to seizure. They were right. Training courses in forensic analysis will be incorporated into the National Civil Police (PNC) Training Academy. The PNC is mandated with gathering intelligence to fight criminal organizations and fight crime. “Having advanced search systems facilitates criminal and judicial investigations. Our model, called SafeCity, focuses on achieving a smarter public safety infrastructure through tight integration over the Internet,” said Pedro Cruz, project coordinator for alertos.org. “Video surveillance can be a useful tool for creating intelligence strategies,” said Francisco Guezada, a security analyst at the National Economic Research Center (CIEN). “According to the information collected from surveillance, [security agents] should be able to detect the patterns, routes, and modus operandi of criminals.” “Having advanced search systems facilitates criminal and judicial investigations. Our model, called SafeCity, focuses on achieving a smarter public safety infrastructure through tight integration over the Internet,” said Pedro Cruz, project coordinator for alertos.org. “We currently have three forensic analysis technicians and they will be responsible for training 30 more,” Argueta said. “This way we will improve our criminal investigation processes.” Guatemala has a successful history of using technology to fight crime and improve public safety. “We currently have three forensic analysis technicians and they will be responsible for training 30 more,” Argueta said. “This way we will improve our criminal investigation processes.” Training courses in forensic analysis will be incorporated into the National Civil Police (PNC) Training Academy. The PNC is mandated with gathering intelligence to fight criminal organizations and fight crime. Using technology to fight crime Violence rates in sectors under surveillance have dropped by up to 40 percent since law enforcement authorities installed the video cameras at a cost of $150 million (USD). For example, in 2011, the Safe Cities Association launched the website alertos.org, which integrates surveillance services in high-crime areas and displays detailed information in real time. The creation of this platform seeks to achieve inter-institutional cooperation and increased strategic intelligence in the use and exchange of data. It receives feeds from various information sources, including civil complaints, and creates a statistical database of criminal incidents. In September, the website recorded 46 armed attacks and 84 homicides throughout the country. Guatemala has a successful history of using technology to fight crime and improve public safety. Guatemalan police officials believed the 1,900 surveillance cameras authorities installed in June in different parts of Guatemala City would help them prevent crime and fight violence. “Video surveillance can be a useful tool for creating intelligence strategies,” said Francisco Guezada, a security analyst at the National Economic Research Center (CIEN). “According to the information collected from surveillance, [security agents] should be able to detect the patterns, routes, and modus operandi of criminals.” Presently, the cameras have been installed in various strategic points throughout the city, with a special emphasis on Zone 18, which had a rate of 72 homicides per 100,000 residents in early 2012. By comparison, the entire country has a homicide rate of nearly 40 per 100,000 residents, according to a report presented in April by the United Nations. Police agents monitor the videos from their stations and alert officers on patrol to possible criminal activity in real time. The cameras have helped them respond to crimes quickly enough to capture suspects before they could escape. “Police forces have more ‘eyes’ for surveillance, which prevents criminals from committing crimes,” said Carlos Argueta, Deputy Minister of Technology of the Ministry of the Interior (Mingob). “It’s such a novelty that agents patrolling the streets have support from the center. This has allowed them to make some captures red-handed.” The cameras have different capabilities. The majority of them – about 80 percent – are stationary and aimed at a fixed location. Police can move about 20 percent of them to the right and left and up and down. And 10 percent of them have facial recognition capability – meaning that they can identify criminals by their faces through their connection to a database maintained by the National Register of Persons (Renap). Police can also compare footage of license plates to the Tax Administration Authority (SAT)’s database to see if vehicles under surveillance have been reported stolen or are subject to seizure. Police authorities plan on installing an additional 2,100 surveillance cameras throughout Guatemala City by the end of 2014. Many of the cameras will be placed in neighborhoods at-risk for violent crime, such as Mixco and Amatitlán in the Central District, as well as Escuintla and Sacatepéquez. Using technology to fight crime The surveillance cameras are not only helping police respond quickly to criminal activity, they are helping law enforcement authorities gather data that will allow them to develop long-term approaches to fighting crime. Violence rates in sectors under surveillance have dropped by up to 40 percent since law enforcement authorities installed the video cameras at a cost of $150 million (USD). Surveillance cameras help police develop anti-crime strategies: Analyst Guatemalan police officials believed the 1,900 surveillance cameras authorities installed in June in different parts of Guatemala City would help them prevent crime and fight violence. Surveillance cameras help police develop anti-crime strategies: Analyst For example, in 2011, the Safe Cities Association launched the website alertos.org, which integrates surveillance services in high-crime areas and displays detailed information in real time. The creation of this platform seeks to achieve inter-institutional cooperation and increased strategic intelligence in the use and exchange of data. It receives feeds from various information sources, including civil complaints, and creates a statistical database of criminal incidents. In September, the website recorded 46 armed attacks and 84 homicides throughout the country. Police authorities plan on installing an additional 2,100 surveillance cameras throughout Guatemala City by the end of 2014. Many of the cameras will be placed in neighborhoods at-risk for violent crime, such as Mixco and Amatitlán in the Central District, as well as Escuintla and Sacatepéquez. The initiative stays in constant contact with security authorities to share information such as data on suspicious license plates, criminal profiles, and patterns of behavior in certain areas. This strengthens the Strategy for Citizen Security, which is focused on fighting crime and preventing crime. To complement this strategy, more institutional presence is needed.last_img read more