Winter diseases

first_imgTo help keep diseases out of your winter annual flowerbeds, University of Georgia plant pathologist Jean Williams-Woodward recommends starting with disease-resistant plants.“Selecting powdery mildew resistant cultivars of crape myrtles is easy. Just buy the ones with the Indian names,” said Williams-Woodward, a scientist with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. These include the white flowering, ‘Natchez’ and the lavender flowering ‘Muskogee.’ Selecting disease resistant flowering annuals takes a little more thought.Pick the right varietiesWhen adding pansies to your winter landscape, she recommends selecting from this list of leaf spot resistant varieties: ‘Bingo Red & Yellow,’ ‘Crown Blue,’ ‘Crown Golden,’ ‘Crystal Bowl Supreme Yellow,’ ‘Crystal Bowl True Blue,’ ‘Dynamite Red & Yellow,’ ‘Majestic Giants Yellow’ and ‘Viola Sorbet Blackberry Cream.’ “Leaf spot resistance doesn’t mean they are totally immune to disease,” she said. “It means they get less disease than a susceptible variety.”If Patiola pansies are your flower of choice, Williams-Woodard recommends buying Purple Passion Mix, Pure Yellow, Pure Lemon and Pure Orange. These varieties are all less susceptible to Cercospora leaf spot than the Colossus series cultivars, she said.Remove infected plantsThis season Williams-Woodward expects to see snapdragons and pansies with downy mildew. This disease likes wet, humid and cooler weather. “The best control method is to remove the downy mildew infected plants because it spreads very fast,” she said. “You can send the plants to me because I personally love mildews. Once it spreads in your flowerbed, you won’t be able to control it.”Impatiens, another Georgia landscape favorite, is often infected by downy mildew. Williams-Woodward says home landscapers who saw the disease on their impatiens last year, will see it again if they plant in the same spot. “It can be hard to spot the symptoms – rapid defoliation, subtle leaf discoloration, downward cupping of leaves and white sporulation on the leaf underside – but eventually your impatiens will look like bare stems or twigs,” she said.You get what you pay forRoot rot disease is also a major problem in winter landscape beds. Georgia has had a fairly wet winter, which will make conditions ideal for root rot disease.“If you buy cheap plants from the ‘almost dead rack’ you are buying and bringing home problems,” Williams-Woodward said.To help prevent root rot diseases, she recommends installing plants at a higher elevation, not planting too deeply, improving soil drainage and redirecting water so plants are not overwatered. “And try not to till in old plants and plant materials,” she said. “If you had disease there before you are just incorporating that material back into the area.”Root rot diseases thrive in moisture, so inspect plant beds and make sure there are no sources of extra water, such as a downspout aimed into the bed or an irrigation pattern that directly hits the area.Numerous cases of black root rot (Thielaviopsis basicola) are being reported. It produces black spores in chains that survive in soil. In large numbers they cause the roots to look black, thus the name.“We are seeing a lot of it this year but some years we don’t. It favors cooler temperatures and alkaline soils, so keeping the pH below 5.8 will reduce it,” she said.Avoiding susceptible plants will also help fight black root rot. Susceptible plants include vincas, pansies/violas, snapdragons, impatiens, petunias, calibrachoas, verbenas and begonias. Less susceptible plants are salvias, geraniums, marigolds, zinnias, dusty millers, coleuses and celosias.“I haven’t met a calibrachoa yet that isn’t susceptible to black root rot,” she said.Follow these tipsOverall, to help reduce the amount of disease growing in your landscape flowerbeds, Williams-Woodward recommends following these tips:Follow good sanitation practices.Propagate from clean stock.Plant the correct plant in the correct location.Manage and modify the environment. (But don’t over water.)Use resistant cultivars.Eliminate disease-prone plants.Use, but don’t rely on, chemical control.Keep your tools clean. “Keeping track of what diseases you have in your beds now will help you plan for your landscape in the future,” she said.last_img read more

City Harvest: another life for London’s waste food

first_imgGallery: City Harvest LondonCity Harvest1 of 4City Harvest 1> Though the charity relies on help from volunteers (with the likes of Harvey Nichols routinely sending its staff to help sort surplus) it does pay its drivers to ensure it can meet demand from storesCity Harvest 3> Over Christmas 75% of food donated was fresh fruit & vegThe charity now works with nearly ever major supermarket, as well as corporate canteens, film studios and event venuesCity Harvest 2> Capacity has doubled in the past year with seven City Harvest vans now visiting stores and charities from its West London HQCity Harvest 5> Since 2014 it has collected 735 tonnes for redistribution1234 Though the charity relies on help from volunteers (with the likes of Harvey Nichols routinely sending its staff to help sort surplus) it does pay its drivers to ensure it can meet demand from stores Over Christmas 75% of food donated was fresh fruit & vegThe charity now works with nearly ever major supermarket, as well as corporate canteens, film studios and event venues Capacity has doubled in the past year with seven City Harvest vans now visiting stores and charities from its West London HQ Since 2014 it has collected 735 tonnes for redistribution City HarvestThough the charity relies on help from volunteers (with the likes of Harvey Nichols routinely sending its staff to help sort surplus) it does pay its drivers to ensure it can meet demand from storesoriginaldate 1/1/0001 6:00:00 AMheight 460width 620orientation 1camerasoftware Adobe Photoshop CC (Over Christmas 75% of food donated was fresh fruit & vegThe charity now works with nearly ever major supermarket, as well as corporate canteens, film studios and event venuesoriginaldate 1/1/0001 6:00:00 AMheight 460width 620orientation 1camerasoftware Adobe Photoshop CC (Capacity has doubled in the past year with seven City Harvest vans now visiting stores and charities from its West London HQoriginaldate 1/1/0001 6:00:00 AMheight 460width 620orientation 1camerasoftware Adobe Photoshop CC (Since 2014 it has collected 735 tonnes for redistributionoriginaldate 1/1/0001 6:00:00 AMheight 460width 620orientation 1camerasoftware Adobe Photoshop CC ( We want food to be eaten – not end up in the bin. Join our campaign and help us lobby government to take action on food waste: Pledge your support here City Harvest works the capital’s ‘last mile’, passing food from supermarkets and events to charities that need itWe’d get five times that from one of the large supermarkets.” Laura Winningham, CEO of charity City Harvest, is pointing to a trolley overflowing with artisan rolls, gourmet carrot cakes, pastries and fresh veg being wheeled toward us at the Whole Foods Market flagship store on Kensington High Street. Bags full of posh focaccia so heavy we can hardly lift them are passed to driver Jason as he packs crates into a van already loaded with chicken from Nando’s, snacks from Graze and sandwiches from a Tesco Express. We’re halfway through a daily run for the charity, which rescues wasted food from London stores and drops it off at nearby charities or non-profits, passing through Fulham, Hammersmith and Kensington via five grocers, three hostels and two soup kitchens. To date the team has redistributed 735 tonnes this way, enough to create 1.7 million meals for vulnerable people. In the past 12 months they’ve more than doubled capacity too, with seven vans now travelling across London each day and a new depot opening in April 2017 to store an increasing volume of surplus food. Winningham co-founded the charity with her husband and two friends four years ago, inspired by the US-based City Harvest she’d watched driving 18-wheelers in her native New York, picking up 50 tonnes-plus of surplus each day. “I figured London can’t be that different in its need for this type of thing,” she says. “So I just did it, knowing nothing about food, or vans or really anything. But it’s surprising what you can learn.” From “going around and popping their head in” a few local stores with one loaned van, City Harvest now works with almost every major supermarket chain in the city, as well as picking up leftovers from corporate canteens, events held at the likes of Olympia, film sets and defunct brands. Unlike FareShare, which has huge volumes of surplus delivered from distribution depots and manufacturers, City Harvest focuses on that “last mile” between the store and charity, working with FareShare to ensure surplus is picked up from many smaller stores signed up to Tesco’s Food Cloud system. And it’s put to good use. Every morsel collected by City Harvest’s drivers (all of whom are paid) is either handed direct to charities, stored in its new Acton depot or, in the tiny number of cases where it goes out of date, handed to a Shropshire farmer for pigfeed. “It really does help us,” says Michael Angus, manager for the Barons Court Project, a day centre for homeless and mentally ill people, as we hand over bread and vegetables for its Hammersmith kitchen. “I reckon we’ve saved on average £2k-3k per year through the donations we get. For us that’s a significant amount.”Ten minutes away, chef Andrew Calvocoressi is whipping up turkey hotpot, pork meatballs and egg drop soup – all made with the donated surplus food – at homeless charity The Upper Room. “I use everything,” he says. “I’ve been cooking for 40 years and I don’t think I’ve ever cooked so well because the produce is so good, and that’s half the battle.” But for Winningham there is still so much more surplus to access. “It’s funny. When we started we thought we’d have unlimited food and we wouldn’t have enough people to bring it to. Now we need more food.” As well as flicking through The Grocer each week to find new London startups with surplus to spare, Winningham believes building awareness even further among food companies will be crucial to securing more food. That means smoothing out the grass-roots process of picking up surplus. Too often staff turnover means relationships between drivers and store staff are lost (and with it a load of available surplus) while a lack of clear process mean drivers are sometimes presented with rubbish bags stuffed with unsorted surplus and rubbish. “Redistribution has to be part of the smooth operation of the store,” says Winningham. “Once it becomes the fabric of the business it’ll run as smoothly as the business. The CEO needs to set a process and evaluate cost, time and sustainability.” It’s all still a steep learning curve, she admits. “We’re four years in but that’s still a very young organisation.” One with plenty more scope to grow. “As long as there is demand we should grow until all those people have as much food as they need.” And with that, we’re on to our next drop-off.Sign our petitionlast_img read more

Cal looks to end streak vs Washington St.

first_imgCal looks to end streak vs Washington St. Associated Press February 18, 2020 BIG MEN ON CAMPUS: Washington State’s CJ Elleby has averaged 18.7 points and 7.5 rebounds while Isaac Bonton has put up 13.7 points. For the Golden Bears, Matt Bradley has averaged 17.8 points and 5.1 rebounds while Grant Anticevich has put up 8.4 points and 5.6 rebounds.MIGHTY MATT: Bradley has connected on 38.1 percent of the 134 3-pointers he’s attempted and has made 8 of 18 over the last three games. He’s also converted 84.2 percent of his foul shots this season.WINLESS WHEN: Washington State is 0-6 this year when it scores 62 points or fewer and 14-6 when it scores at least 63.COLD SPELL: Cal has lost its last seven road games, scoring 53.4 points, while allowing 69.1 per game.DID YOU KNOW: Washington State has committed a turnover on just 16.6 percent of its possessions this season, which is the second-best percentage among all Pac-12 teams. The Cougars have turned the ball over only 11.7 times per game this season.___center_img For more AP college basketball coverage: https://apnews.com/Collegebasketball and http://twitter.com/AP_Top25___This was generated by Automated Insights, http://www.automatedinsights.com/ap, using data from STATS LLC, https://www.stats.com Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditCal (10-15, 4-8) vs. Washington State (14-12, 5-8)Wallis Beasley Performing Arts Coliseum, Pullman, Washington; Wednesday, 10 p.m. ESTBOTTOM LINE: Washington State looks to extend Cal’s conference losing streak to five games. Cal’s last Pac-12 win came against the Oregon State Beavers 69-67 on Feb. 1. Washington State lost 70-51 on the road to Southern California on Saturday.last_img read more